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When to use the verb "Ser" and when to use "Estar"

 

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  #91  
Old October 21, 2013, 06:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Liquinn3 View Post
Estoy cansando.
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  #92  
Old October 21, 2013, 07:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
Number 3 is the best option out of the three you gave, but the very best option is to use the impersonal 'se' construct. Next best would be to use the 'pasiva refleja' construct.
So, "se me engañó"? And what would be the "pasiva refleja" option?
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  #93  
Old October 21, 2013, 07:47 PM
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The 'pasiva refleja' can be used as a better choice for the passive voice.
The verb in question needs to take a direct object in order to use this construct.

Examples of the 'pasiva refleja', using a verb that takes a direct object.
Se venden casas.
Se vende leche.

The subject-patient drives whether the verb is in the plural or the singular third person, in this construct.

Last edited by Rusty; October 21, 2013 at 07:54 PM.
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  #94  
Old April 16, 2014, 12:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Tomisimo View Post
Both soy casado and estoy casado are correct. There is a slight nuance in the meaning though:

Estoy casado = I am married.
Soy casado = I am a married man.

Estoy refers to your state of being married, and soy to your quality of being married.
So I guess if you say "estoy casados" to your wife you better be prepared to get beat.
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  #95  
Old April 16, 2014, 08:26 AM
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No, there is nothing intrinsically offensive in any of the sentences; it's just the way people talk. The tone and the intention are something else.

By the way, "casados" is a plural form, so the sentence should be "estoy casado", or "estamos casados".
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  #96  
Old April 27, 2014, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
@Lou Ann: David is right about "ser/estar casado". In Mexico is equally frequent to say one or the other.

--¿Ya conociste al nuevo gerente? (Have you met the new manager?)
--Sí, ¿sabes si es casado? / ¿crees que esté casado? (Yes, do you know/believe he's married?)


As for "estar muerto", "estar" is the right choice most of the times.
"Ser muerto" would mean some kind of zombie or so.

El médico no pudo hacer nada por Juan. Está muerto.
The doctor couldn't do anything for Juan. He's dead.


Someone joking in a graveyard:
¡Soy un muerto que sale de su tumba! ¡BU!
I'm a deadman coming out of his grave! BOO!
Estar muerto is a state situation

also there are some locutions with ser as : El es hombre muerto si se enfrenta a la mafia local.
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  #97  
Old April 27, 2014, 04:42 PM
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  #98  
Old June 08, 2014, 09:18 PM
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Sad (triste) is a temporary condition, so I would use estar, but what if I am talking about a book's ending? Would I use ser since the ending doesn't change?
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  #99  
Old June 08, 2014, 11:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Falda Verde View Post
Sad (triste) is a temporary condition, so I would use estar, but what if I am talking about a book's ending? Would I use ser since the ending doesn't change?
'Sad' can be a characteristic of a person (normally sad) or a condition/state (not always so). For the former, you'd use 'ser triste'; for the latter, 'estar triste'. The original post in the thread doesn't mention 'temporary'. Think more in terms of 'characteristic' or 'state'.
The story written in a book can be 'sad', 'uplifting', 'scary', etc. All are used to describe or define the story at a particular moment. Since these are definitive labels, the verb to use is 'ser'. 'Es triste la parte cuando muere uno de los hijos.'

When we talk about a happy ending or a sad ending in a book, it's common to use 'tener un final feliz' or 'tener un final triste'. But you may also say, "El final del libro es triste." That's a defining characteristic.

Last edited by Rusty; June 09, 2014 at 12:35 AM.
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  #100  
Old June 11, 2014, 07:38 PM
Falda Verde Falda Verde is offline
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How about with a situation where you want to say, "I want to be entertained by this book." Would that use ser: "Quiero ser entretenido por este libro."
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