#11  
Old June 08, 2011, 08:04 PM
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Alguien dijo Taste = sabor

Yo diría que más bien sería saborear, si así se va a usar.

por otro lado, taste= gusto y (de)gustar, creo no?
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  #12  
Old June 13, 2011, 03:10 PM
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The most significant difference between the verbs 'like' and 'gustar' is that the person is the subject of the verb 'like' and the thing being liked is the object; whereas with 'gustar' the reverse applies - the person is the object of the verb and the thing is the subject.

For example "I (subject) like bananas (object)" whilst the Spanish translation would be - "Me (object) gustan los platanos (subject)".

I'm sure there are many beginners who refer to Tomísimo and are perhaps unsure of how 'gustar' works, and I am offering this in the hope it is of assistance.

I know the correct use of 'gustar' took a long time to penetrate my thick skull, and I expect many others find it difficult too!
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Last edited by Sancho Panther; June 13, 2011 at 03:32 PM.
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  #13  
Old July 02, 2011, 11:12 AM
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So, the other day, a Peruvian friend says to me: "Si gustas, podemos comer ......" I knew what she meant ... but was surprised by the grammar construction. When I asked her about it, she really couldn't explain the "why", she could only just tell me what she meant. This is the first time that I'm aware of that I have heard a native speaker conjugate "gustar" in other than the third person. Huh????
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Old July 02, 2011, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
So, the other day, a Peruvian friend says to me: "Si gustas, podemos comer ......" I knew what she meant ... but was surprised by the grammar construction. When I asked her about it, she really couldn't explain the "why", she could only just tell me what she meant. This is the first time that I'm aware of that I have heard a native speaker conjugate "gustar" in other than the third person. Huh????
Good question - I'd be interested myself. On a similar note, I've just found this in my dictionary under gustar:

2 gustar de algo to like something; es muy serio, no gusta de bromas he is very serious, he doesn't like jokes; no gusta de alabanzas she doesn't like to be praised, she doesn't like o enjoy being praised;

Now this gusta is also 3rd singular, but in the above, could it be adapted to eres muy serio, no gustas de bromas ??? (or is there a le missing)


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Old July 02, 2011, 11:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
Now this gusta is also 3rd singular, but in the above, could it be adapted to eres muy serio, no gustas de bromas ??? (or is there a le missing)


"... no gustaS de bromas..."????? .... YES, that is what has me messed up. I didn't have any trouble with gustar until two days ago.
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  #16  
Old July 02, 2011, 12:01 PM
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Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
"... no gustaS de bromas..."????? .... YES, that is what has me messed up. I didn't have any trouble with gustar until two days ago.
And I didn't have any trouble with it until 15 minutes ago
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Old July 02, 2011, 12:23 PM
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The use of gustar de isn't very common and sounds ancient (because it is). It can be found in literary works.

What your Peruvian friend said is purely colloquial. It's the same construct above, but without the preposition.

If you say 'me likey' in English, everyone understands it, but it isn't grammatically correct by any means. I would choose to tolerate, but not adopt, the occasional colloquialisms you hear.

Gustar can be fully conjugated, Lou Ann. It isn't always used in the 3rd person.
Me gustas. = I like you.
Te gusto. = You like me.
Les gustamos. = They like us.
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Old July 02, 2011, 12:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
And I didn't have any trouble with it until 15 minutes ago
Sorry. I hope we can still be friends.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
The use of gustar de isn't very common and sounds ancient (because it is). It can be found in literary works.

What your Peruvian friend said is purely colloquial. It's the same construct above, but without the preposition.

If you say 'me likey' in English, everyone understands it, but it isn't grammatically correct by any means. I would choose to tolerate, but not adopt, the occasional colloquialisms you hear.

Gustar can be fully conjugated, Lou Ann. It isn't always used in the 3rd person.
Me gustas. = I like you.
Te gusto. = You like me.
Les gustamos. = They like us.
Right. I remember reading threads about the various conjugations of gustar and what they mean. But I haven't actually heard or read a use of it outside of the third person until now.......

Thanks for pointing to the colloquial usage. I do think that I shall avoid using it.
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  #19  
Old July 02, 2011, 12:30 PM
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When you learn Portuguese, you'll use gostar de all the time.
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  #20  
Old July 02, 2011, 12:32 PM
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I'm going to hold off on the Portuguese...... Although my friends in Uruguay live on the border of Uruguay & Brazil, and their kids are taught Spanish, English, & Portuguese all through their years of school. Instead of speaking "Spanglish", they speak "Portuñol".
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