#21  
Old July 02, 2011, 12:54 PM
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Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
So, the other day, a Peruvian friend says to me: "Si gustas, podemos comer ......" I knew what she meant ... but was surprised by the grammar construction. When I asked her about it, she really couldn't explain the "why", she could only just tell me what she meant. This is the first time that I'm aware of that I have heard a native speaker conjugate "gustar" in other than the third person. Huh????
This is the normal Spanish.

Si () gustas, podemos ir al cine...

If you like we can go/could go to the cinema/movie theater...

Gustar de, is old but still used and very much read.

Gusto de las películas = me gustan las películas etc.
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  #22  
Old July 02, 2011, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Sorry. I hope we can still be friends.
Nothing to be sorry for - I've just learned something new. Thank you.
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  #23  
Old July 02, 2011, 06:25 PM
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Elaina Elaina is offline
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Originally Posted by Luna Azul View Post
"Gustar" means "to like"

"to please" is "placer"

There's a difference between "please" and "like" in English and in Spanish also.

"Placer" is used with the same construction as "gustar": "Me place". The meaning is similar but not exactly the same.

We don't say things like "Esta casa me place", for example. It sounds weird. In that sentence we use "gustar".

"placer" is normally used with concepts, not objects: "me place estar aquí", "nos place mucho que hayas venido".

The only reason why "to please" is used when teaching "gustar" is that it makes it easier to understand since the construction in English for "please" is closer to Spanish than the construction for "like".

It's a useful tool for teachers to explain the verb. That's all.

Wouldn't you use complacer to please? Or is this a different type of please?

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Last edited by Elaina; July 02, 2011 at 06:25 PM. Reason: corrected spelling error
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  #24  
Old July 03, 2011, 02:02 PM
Luna Azul Luna Azul is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elaina View Post
Wouldn't you use complacer to please? Or is this a different type of please?

"Placer" is one of those complex verbs that are generally used only in the third person. It's intrasitive: "Me place...."
"Me place mucho haberte conocido"


It's normally used in the Present of Indicative only. There are conjugations for this verb but, as opposed to "gustar", no one ever uses them, only in literary works.

"Complacer"
is the 'corresponding' transitive verb, so to speak. "Yo te complazco" = "I please you"

As an intransitive verb, it's used similarly to "placer": "Me complace mucho haberte conocido", has the same meaning as the sentence with "placer". It's used in the same instances as "placer" with the third person.

However, we say "Me complació mucho haberte conocido" (preterite), but you'll hardly ever hear "me plació mucho ......"

If it's a little confusing, I'd stick with "complacer" in this context...

The usual, most used way to say this is "Fue un placer haberte conocido". Of course, "placer" in this sentence is a noun...

Hope it helps
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Last edited by Luna Azul; July 03, 2011 at 02:04 PM.
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