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Old January 07, 2017, 06:23 PM
Glen Glen is online now
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Apreciable

I've come across the salutation Muy apreciable amigo and like the sound of it, but wonder if it's considered too formal for use among close friends.
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Old January 07, 2017, 07:19 PM
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AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
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It's respectful, formal and ceremonious.
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Old January 07, 2017, 08:08 PM
Glen Glen is online now
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How does it compare to Muy estimado amigo? Along the same lines? On radio programs I hear estimados oyentes.

And what would be some examples of less stuffy-sounding forms of greeting?

Last edited by Glen; January 07, 2017 at 08:13 PM.
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Old January 07, 2017, 09:46 PM
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AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
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If you use the word "amigo", this is formal writing normally.

- A nuestros apreciables visitantes...
- Estimado cliente...
- Muy estimado amigo...
- Muy señor mío y amigo... (This one is a little old-fashioned, but it's still found sometimes in office letters.)

...

A more informal register never uses "apreciado(a)"/"apreciable", and it's common to write "querido(a)"/"estimado(a)" and the name of the person. By the way, "estimado" may feel detached or not very sincere, but it will depend on the context and the person to whom it's addressed. For example an aunt you don't deal often with, a friend you haven't seen for long... In those cases, the person may not be the closest to you, but you make them feel you are happy to stay in touch with them.

- Querida Julia, acabo de recibir tu mensaje.
- Estimada Aurora, te deseo un muy feliz cumpleaños.
- Estimados Lilia y Pedro, muchas gracias por recibirnos en su casa.
- Ernesto querido, gracias por las felicitaciones de año nuevo. (Inverting the order of "querido" puts an emphasis on the affection.)
- Mi estimado Rodrigo, me dio mucho gusto verte.
- Estimada Anita, ojalá podamos vernos pronto.


Or some formulas without affectionate adjectives:
- Rosy, amiga, te mando un abrazo muy fuerte. (The pause of "amiga" makes the person feel your friendship closer.)
- Juanjo, ojalá nos visites pronto, sabes que se te quiere. (The impersonal doesn't imply a lack of affection, but "te quiero" is far more intense.)
- Recibe un abrazo con mucho cariño.
...
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Old January 08, 2017, 04:57 PM
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aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
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Apreciado (esteemed)

... apreciable (worth of esteem) is not as flattery as it looks, especially preceded by muy and followed by amigo -it may be popular imitation of posh manners-.
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