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Macerado de caléndula en aceite de oliva extra virgen

 

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  #1  
Old October 02, 2012, 02:08 PM
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Macerado de caléndula en aceite de oliva extra virgen

Macerate with pot marigold in extra virgin olive oil

or

Pot marigold macerate in extra virgin olive oil

Thanks.
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  #2  
Old October 02, 2012, 03:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Macerate with pot marigold in extra virgin olive oil

or

Pot marigold macerated in extra virgin olive oil

Thanks.
'Steeped' could be used instead of macerated. You could also use 'infused'. Both are improvements over 'macerated' because I had no idea what that meant.
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Old October 02, 2012, 10:01 PM
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Would "marinated" be valid here as well?
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Old October 02, 2012, 11:29 PM
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Originally Posted by JPablo View Post
Would "marinated" be valid here as well?
Not necessarily.

To macerate something is to soften or break it down by soaking it in a liquid. The focus is on the softening or breaking down.

To marinate food is to soak it in a marinade for the purpose of flavoring or softening it. A marinade is specifically a mixture of vinager (or sometimes another acidic liquid such a the juice of a citrus fruit), oil, and herbs or spices. Adding to the flavor of the food is an important part of marinating it.
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Old October 03, 2012, 12:43 AM
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Thank you.

But why 'macerated'? Couldn't I use macerate, as a substantive. If I say pot marigold macerated, it seems that I'm going to use the plant, but I'm going to use the oil. I throw the plants away.

We say 'infusión' when water is used, not with oil.
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Old October 03, 2012, 02:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
But why 'macerated'? Couldn't I use macerate, as a substantive. If I say pot marigold macerated, it seems that I'm going to use the plant, but I'm going to use the oil. I throw the plants away.

We say 'infusión' when water is used, not with oil.
You are correct, both the past participle and the noun mean that you are using the plant. What you use is the juice or essence from the macerating process. I also think you are right about 'infusion'.

So 'Pot marigold juice/essence in extra virgin olive oil'

Edit: 'Juice of macerated pot marigold in extra virgin olive oil'

Last edited by Perikles; October 03, 2012 at 02:59 AM.
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Old October 03, 2012, 11:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Thank you.

But why 'macerated'? Couldn't I use macerate, as a substantive. If I say pot marigold macerated, it seems that I'm going to use the plant, but I'm going to use the oil. I throw the plants away.

We say 'infusión' when water is used, not with oil.
Wordreference.com shows two nouns derived from the verb: maceration (the result of macerating something), and macerator (something/someone that macerates).
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Old October 03, 2012, 01:48 PM
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Thinking about it, I guess I should use the word 'oil', since what I use is the oil, after throwing away the plants which have been maceraing in the oil. So maybe I should say something like: 'oil in which pot marigold have been macerating'.
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Old October 04, 2012, 12:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Thinking about it, I guess I should use the word 'oil', since what I use is the oil, after throwing away the plants which have been maceraing in the oil. So maybe I should say something like: 'oil in which pot marigold have been macerating'.
I don't think this is correct. To macerate means to soften by steeping in a liquid, with or without heat (L. macerare from Gr. massein to knead, -> massage). This process is clearly referring to use of the macerated solid afterwards, but in your case you discard it.

So what you mean is

'oil in which pot marigold has been steeped'

(note the singular for a quantity of marigold, not a number of plants)

Edit: this suggests that the Spanish expression is also incorrect, but I would not DARE to challenge that

Last edited by Perikles; October 04, 2012 at 12:39 AM.
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Old October 04, 2012, 08:27 AM
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This word is driving me crazy

'Macerado' is the Spanish word used in that context and with people with the same interests as me. I've looked it up at the RAE, the second entry will be the one I want to translate:

http://lema.rae.es/drae/?val=macerado

2. tr. Mantener sumergida alguna sustancia sólida en un líquido a la temperatura ambiente, con el fin de ablandarla o de extraer de ella las partes solubles.

That is what I'm doing with pot marigold, although I can do it with other herbs, such as rosemary, with several plants or just one. I'm extracting the beneficial parts of a plant when steeping (?) them in oil.

So, for instance I could say: Oil in which pot marigold and rosemary (just to use the plural) have been steeped in Would it be understood?
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