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El que no se embarra no goza

 

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Old September 03, 2023, 07:22 AM
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El que no se embarra no goza

I have the general meaning but could someone clarify the exact translation.

What does "El Que" mean?

"If one.....?......as in a general statement.....


Gracias.
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Old September 03, 2023, 09:22 AM
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Typical equivalents in English of the relative pronouns el/la/los/las/lo que include "that which...", "he/she/they/those that/who..." and "the one/ones that/who...". These pronouns have gender and number. The neuter pronoun lo que refers to something that cannot easily be identified by a noun and therefore does not have an associated gender and number, while the others always agree with the grammatical gender and number of the noun(s) that identify whatever the pronoun refers to, even if the noun(s) can be inferred from the context rather than said explicitly.

The verb embarrar means "to muddy/splash with mud/cover with mud". In context it could also have slang meanings. The verb gozar means "to enjoy".

Your expression, el que no se embarra no goza literally means "The one (he) that/who doesn't get muddy doesn't enjoy". As an adage it may have a broader sense, perhaps "he who doesn't embarrass himself (doesn't get embarrassed) doesn't enjoy life".

Last edited by wrholt; September 03, 2023 at 09:26 AM.
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Old September 03, 2023, 08:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrholt View Post
Typical equivalents in English of the relative pronouns el/la/los/las/lo que include "that which...", "he/she/they/those that/who..." and "the one/ones that/who...". These pronouns have gender and number. The neuter pronoun lo que refers to something that cannot easily be identified by a noun and therefore does not have an associated gender and number, while the others always agree with the grammatical gender and number of the noun(s) that identify whatever the pronoun refers to, even if the noun(s) can be inferred from the context rather than said explicitly.

The verb embarrar means "to muddy/splash with mud/cover with mud". In context it could also have slang meanings. The verb gozar means "to enjoy".

Your expression, el que no se embarra no goza literally means "The one (he) that/who doesn't get muddy doesn't enjoy". As an adage it may have a broader sense, perhaps "he who doesn't embarrass himself (doesn't get embarrassed) doesn't enjoy life".
Thank you for the response and helpful info.

As a context I got this phrase from "Caso Cerrado" which I'm watching and listening to for the Cuban accent and others.

It's helped a lot.
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