Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Vocabulary > Idioms & Sayings


De lo vivo a lo pintado

 

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not readily apparent based on the individual words in the expression. This forum is dedicated to discussing idioms and other sayings.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old April 21, 2019, 10:05 PM
poli's Avatar
poli poli is offline
rule 1: gravity
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In and around New York
Posts: 7,417
Native Language: English
poli will become famous soon enoughpoli will become famous soon enough
De lo vivo a lo pintado

I can't figure out what this phrase means.
__________________
Me ayuda si corrige mis errores. Gracias.
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old April 21, 2019, 10:22 PM
JPablo's Avatar
JPablo JPablo is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 5,579
Native Language: Spanish (Castilian, peninsular)
JPablo is on a distinguished road
Do you have some context?

It would mean to me, how a painter would show reality.

I.e., he would see a "live scene", and the reflect that in his paintings.

Like at Salvador Dalí's Museum, at Figueres (Girona, Spain), I saw a "little" painting he had in a corner.

It was just a bread. But it was amazingly real..., better than any photograph.
He was able to go from the "live reality" into the "painted reality" with an amazing ease.

Again, I don't know what is your context, but that's my first impression.

Saludos cordiales, Poli.
__________________
Lo propio de la verdad es que se basta a sí misma, aquel que la posee no intenta convencer a nadie.
"An enemy is somebody who flatters you. A friend is somebody who criticizes the living daylights out of you."
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old April 22, 2019, 12:13 PM
aleCcowaN's Avatar
aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Posts: 3,092
Native Language: Castellano
aleCcowaN is on a distinguished road
It's generally used to point the huge differences between two related things or two different approaches to the same thing; similar to "del dicho al hecho... (hay mucho trecho)", the latter specifically used to point out the difference between the declared intentions and the real actions.

"De lo vivo a lo pintado" evokes the cartoon image showing a splendid house or car that suddenly moves down revealing it's a picture that was covering the view of the real thing, which is a lemon. However it's not necessarily used as a negative thing and it's widely used to depict different points of view or even meta-messages.

[a lemon is "una batata" in Argentina, how do they call that in other countries?]
__________________
[gone]
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old April 23, 2019, 09:25 PM
poli's Avatar
poli poli is offline
rule 1: gravity
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In and around New York
Posts: 7,417
Native Language: English
poli will become famous soon enoughpoli will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by aleCcowaN View Post
It's generally used to point the huge differences between two related things or two different approaches to the same thing; similar to "del dicho al hecho... (hay mucho trecho)", the latter specifically used to point out the difference between the declared intentions and the real actions.

"De lo vivo a lo pintado" evokes the cartoon image showing a splendid house or car that suddenly moves down revealing it's a picture that was covering the view of the real thing, which is a lemon. However it's not necessarily used as a negative thing and it's widely used to depict different points of view or even meta-messages.

[a lemon is "una batata" in Argentina, how do they call that in other countries?]
Alec, I just checked with someone from Colombia who said there is no exact term for lemon or batata in his region, but stated the Caribbean catchall phrase, una porquería as a term that would surfice.
__________________
Me ayuda si corrige mis errores. Gracias.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old April 24, 2019, 09:49 AM
aleCcowaN's Avatar
aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Posts: 3,092
Native Language: Castellano
aleCcowaN is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
Alec, I just checked with someone from Colombia who said there is no exact term for lemon or batata in his region, but stated the Caribbean catchall phrase, una porquería as a term that would surfice.

I think that catch-all phrase is quite universal. We also use cacharro, trasto/traste. Chatarra for machinery, vehicles and whatnot; and in addition, specifically for cars, carcacha/o and cafetera. And the ubiquitous cachivache, if not the Caribbean viejera.
__________________
[gone]
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old April 24, 2019, 11:29 AM
poli's Avatar
poli poli is offline
rule 1: gravity
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In and around New York
Posts: 7,417
Native Language: English
poli will become famous soon enoughpoli will become famous soon enough
In reference to cars, viejera and chatarra usually refers to an old vehicle. In USA English, we use a piece of tin or a bomb for that. A term that is very specific to cars but used less now (I think) is jalopy. Only new ones that brake down a lot are referred to as lemons.
__________________
Me ayuda si corrige mis errores. Gracias.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old April 24, 2019, 01:32 PM
aleCcowaN's Avatar
aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Posts: 3,092
Native Language: Castellano
aleCcowaN is on a distinguished road
We call batata any car that lives many of its days in the repair shop, either because it's old and worn, or new and badly designed or manufactured, or second hand of any age which has been not maintained in good conditions so it's bound to break down a lot. Additionally, they can be pegged, in order, as un vejestorio, una porquería and ...

-"¡te vieron la cara, querido!"
-"Es que me lo pintaron como una oportunidad.

En teoría era una buena compra"

Porque "una cosa es la teoría y otra la práctica", another way to say one of the meanings of "de lo vivo a lo pintado".

[which takes us back to the topic of the thread]
__________________
[gone]
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old April 24, 2019, 02:43 PM
JPablo's Avatar
JPablo JPablo is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 5,579
Native Language: Spanish (Castilian, peninsular)
JPablo is on a distinguished road
@ Poli: What is the context where you got the expression from?

It could make a big difference on meaning, or just a nuance. But any word or expression could mean many different things, depending on where it is...
__________________
Lo propio de la verdad es que se basta a sí misma, aquel que la posee no intenta convencer a nadie.
"An enemy is somebody who flatters you. A friend is somebody who criticizes the living daylights out of you."
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old April 24, 2019, 05:45 PM
poli's Avatar
poli poli is offline
rule 1: gravity
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In and around New York
Posts: 7,417
Native Language: English
poli will become famous soon enoughpoli will become famous soon enough
JPablo, the term lemon comes from a time not in the recent past when new expensive products performed badly. Pardon me Ford, but an old joke went that F.O.R.D. meant found on the road dead. Example: You buy a new car and it starts leaking oil or the door falls off, a new washing machine stops in the middle of a cycle and starts smoking. There have been lemon laws in which aided the consumer to get their money back on a new car that just wasn't performing.

Thanks for your explanation Alec. That clarifies it. It's almost like mosquita muerta which is something that seems benign, but in reality, bites. ¿Estoy en los cierto?
__________________
Me ayuda si corrige mis errores. Gracias.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old April 24, 2019, 09:12 PM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,275
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
In Mexico, mostly in the North, obviously influenced by the USA expression, many people say "un limón" for a used old car that won't actually work.
We don't really have a word equivalent to "batata", but we use a lot "porquería" or "mugre" for something we bought expecting a performance that is far better than the one we get.
- El carro me salió una porquería. Me deja tirada en la calle a cada rato.
- Este teléfono es una mugre. La batería no le dura nada.

@Poli: "Mosquita muerta" is only used for people, because they have an intention to deceive. Objects do not have this intention.
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ser/Estar vivo laepelba Vocabulary 19 February 07, 2010 01:36 PM
En vivo ROBINDESBOIS Idioms & Sayings 15 November 01, 2009 05:29 PM
Este vestido me queda que ni pintado Marsopa Idioms & Sayings 19 December 04, 2008 03:11 PM
Rojo vivo. Jane Idioms & Sayings 11 July 22, 2008 06:59 AM
vivo yo pogo Grammar 3 June 07, 2007 06:33 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:48 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X