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The whole kit and caboodle

 

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not readily apparent based on the individual words in the expression. This forum is dedicated to discussing idioms and other sayings.


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  #1  
Old May 25, 2011, 02:19 PM
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The whole kit and caboodle

I was just watching "Antiques Roadshow US, season 15 episode 16, Washington DC Hour One" and I heard "you got the whole kit and caboodle here" -it's heard in 50:07-. It sounded like "stock, lock and barrel": "the whole thing" or "all what is expected to have".

How can we translate it?
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  #2  
Old May 25, 2011, 03:30 PM
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I would say, and I hope I'm right: La cosa entera
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Old May 25, 2011, 04:35 PM
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Thanks. I wonder what extra nuance is adding that "and caboodle". It sounded to me like "the whole kit and then some". What's the perception of native speakers?

[some time passes]

As caboodle seems to have no meaning outside this idiom I wonder if it is not representative of a supposedly rare and exclusive piece or feature that they must have those who have it all, similar to the Argentinean idioms "y (hasta) un monito que te apantalla" or "con todos los chiches" (chiche=toy= figuratively, additional features, pieces, luxurious extras, etc.).

[So far "el juego completo y (con) todos los chiches" might be a good expression to compare with, at least in my idiolect. I also wonder about similar expressions in Spanish]
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Old May 25, 2011, 09:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aleCcowaN View Post
Thanks. I wonder what extra nuance is adding that "and caboodle". It sounded to me like "the whole kit and then some". What's the perception of native speakers?

[some time passes]

As caboodle seems to have no meaning outside this idiom I wonder if it is not representative of a supposedly rare and exclusive piece or feature that they must have those who have it all, similar to the Argentinean idioms "y (hasta) un monito que te apantalla" or "con todos los chiches" (chiche=toy= figuratively, additional features, pieces, luxurious extras, etc.).

[So far "el juego completo y (con) todos los chiches" might be a good expression to compare with, at least in my idiolect. I also wonder about similar expressions in Spanish]
I had to look this one up. I have only heard the word caboodle in the phrase you mentioned. Apparently, the original word was "boodle" which meant a collection of things or a collection of people. Kit was short for kit bag which soldiers carried. So "kit and boodle" became "kit and caboodle" which meant bring your stuff (kit bag) and anything else you can think of.

So from the antiques roadshow it meant "everything you can think of" more or less. "The whole lot" is not a bad translation either.

Last edited by Awaken; May 25, 2011 at 09:06 PM.
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Old May 25, 2011, 10:29 PM
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Like Awaken, I know caboodle only from the expression "kit and caboodle".

It is similar in meaning to "lock, stock and barrel" and to "hook, line and sinker". However, these expressions tend to be used in different contexts.

For me, "kit and caboodle" usually describes a complete collection of some type. For example, someone who goes camping with every single type of gear or gadget that might be useful someday while camping has brought the whole kit and caboodle; the expression functions as a noun.

"Lock, stock and barrel" means "everything", and it functions more as an adverb: for example, 10 years ago AOL bought Compuserve lock, stock and barrel.

"Hook, line and sinker" also means "everything", and it functions more as an adverb. However, we most often use it to describe someone who is gullible enough to believe what they are told by another person; we might say that they bought the story hook, line and sinker.
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Old May 25, 2011, 11:13 PM
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Me parece que los dichos argentinos que escribiste tienen el mismo significado que the whole kit and caboodle.
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Old May 26, 2011, 06:46 AM
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Muchas gracias a todos por las respuestas tan detalladas.

En el contexto de Antiques Roadshow US me parece que corresponde una traducción como "el juego completo y más" o "el juego más que completo". Ese "más" agrega una idea de "and beyond", de que cualquier requisito se ha cumplido en exceso y superará cualquier exigencia.
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Old May 26, 2011, 07:47 AM
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Another example in English is: When you buy a car it may cost $20,000, but with the whole kit and caboodle (taxes, accessories, extended warrenties) it may cost you $23,000.
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Old May 26, 2011, 09:06 AM
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Acá no se usan esos dichos argentinos, pero se entenderían perfectamente.

Un mexicano diría algo como "viene con todo (y todo)", "es el equipo completo", "trae todito" ("toditito" añadiría énfasis), "tiene de todo", "viene muy completo"...

Creo que diríamos el último ejemplo de Poli así: "Cuando compras un coche, te cuesta unos veinte mil dólares, pero con todo lo demás / ya todo completo (impuestos, accesorios, garantías, etc.) podría costarte como veintitrés mil.
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Last edited by AngelicaDeAlquezar; May 26, 2011 at 09:12 AM. Reason: Added comments on previous post
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Old May 26, 2011, 10:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aleCcowaN View Post
Muchas gracias a todos por las respuestas tan detalladas.

En el contexto de Antiques Roadshow US me parece que corresponde una traducción como "el juego completo y más" o "el juego más que completo". Ese "más" agrega una idea de "and beyond", de que cualquier requisito se ha cumplido en exceso y superará cualquier exigencia.
Yes, that's exactly the connotation that the expression typically suggests.
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