Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Grammar


Is the preposition "de" required in this sentence?

 

This is the place for questions about conjugations, verb tenses, adverbs, adjectives, word order, syntax and other grammar questions for English or Spanish.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old September 12, 2013, 03:41 PM
Liquinn3 Liquinn3 is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: England.
Posts: 524
Liquinn3 is on a distinguished road
Is the preposition "de" required in this sentence?

Hoy tengo la oportunidad de escribir más.
Hoy tengo la oportunidad escribir más.

I can't figure out whether the preposition "de" is required.

Could someone confirm whether it's needed or not?
Thanks.

Last edited by Liquinn3; September 12, 2013 at 04:01 PM.
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old September 12, 2013, 04:10 PM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,507
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
It's needed.

The infinitive, contrary to what most people are taught, does NOT have a built-in preposition.
In your sentence, the infinitive is acting a as noun. It's the object of the preposition. You must provide the preposition.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old September 12, 2013, 04:11 PM
Liquinn3 Liquinn3 is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: England.
Posts: 524
Liquinn3 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
It's needed.

The infinitive, contrary to what most people are taught, does NOT have a built-in preposition.
In your sentence, the infinitive is acting a as noun. It's the object of the preposition. You must provide the preposition.
Gracias por tu clarificación.

This follows the same rule, right?

Tengo la intención de escribir más mañana.

Gracias.

Last edited by Liquinn3; September 12, 2013 at 04:13 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old September 12, 2013, 04:31 PM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,507
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Of course. The infinitive, when used as a noun, is translated 'verb+ing' into English.

I have the intention of writing more tomorrow.
I have the opportunity of writing more.

You may also substitute 'to write' in the sentences above, where I wrote 'of writing', but that is where the confusion comes from.
When you use 'to write' in English, you're using a full infinitive, not a verb. 'Writing', a gerund (which is a noun that looks like a verb with an 'ing' ending), can usually be substituted for the full infinitive.

So, "I like reading" and "I like to read" are equivalent sentences. They mean the same thing. In Spanish, the infinitive "leer" would be used in both cases.
Me gusta leer.

We are quite used to saying "Reading is fundamental," but not "To read is fundamental," yet both mean the same thing. In Spanish, the infinitive is used in both cases.
Leer es fundamental.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old September 12, 2013, 04:33 PM
Liquinn3 Liquinn3 is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: England.
Posts: 524
Liquinn3 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
Of course. The infinitive, when used as a noun, is translated 'verb+ing' into English.

I have the intention of writing more tomorrow.
I have the opportunity of writing more.

You may also substitute 'to write' in the sentences above, where I wrote 'of writing', but that is where the confusion comes from.
When you use 'to write' in English, you're using a full infinitive, not a verb. 'Writing', a gerund (which is a noun that looks like a verb with an 'ing' ending), can usually be substituted for the full infinitive.

So, "I like reading" and "I like to read" are equivalent sentences. They mean the same thing. In Spanish, the infinitive "leer" would be used in both cases.
Me gusta leer.

We are quite used to saying "Reading is fundamental," but not "To read is fundamental," yet both mean the same thing. In Spanish, the infinitive is used in both cases.
Leer es fundamental.
Thank you for the reply.

I understand.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old September 25, 2013, 08:52 AM
Michael Visser Michael Visser is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 5
Michael Visser is on a distinguished road
De is a very important and versatile preposition with many different meanings. It combines with the definite articles le and les to form du and des respectively. French de can be used as the equivalent of various English prepositions, including of, from, in, by. De can also be used to express one’s origin — where that person comes from.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old September 25, 2013, 03:19 PM
Liquinn3 Liquinn3 is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: England.
Posts: 524
Liquinn3 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Visser View Post
De is a very important and versatile preposition with many different meanings. It combines with the definite articles le and les to form du and des respectively. French de can be used as the equivalent of various English prepositions, including of, from, in, by. De can also be used to express one’s origin — where that person comes from.
Why isn't the preposition needed here?

La verdad es que...
La razón es que...

But it is here?
Tengo la impresión de que.

Last edited by Liquinn3; September 25, 2013 at 03:41 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old September 26, 2013, 01:49 PM
wrholt's Avatar
wrholt wrholt is offline
Sapphire
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Posts: 1,307
Native Language: US English
wrholt is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquinn3 View Post
Why isn't the preposition needed here?

La verdad es que...
La razón es que...

But it is here?
Tengo la impresión de que.
Look at these sentences that you have asked about in this thread:

Hoy tengo la oportunidad de escribir más.
Tengo la intención de escribir más mañana.

The underlined phrases "la oportunidad", "la intención" and "escribir más" are noun phrases. In each case, the second noun phrase ("to write more", "writing more") is being used as an adjective that modifies the first noun phrase ("the opportunity" or "the intention"). Spanish grammar does not permit using one noun to modify a second noun: the only way to use a noun to modify another noun is to put in in a prepositional phrase, and the choice of preposition is almost always determined by the noun that is being modified. Most of the time the correct preposition is "de".

La verdad es que...
La razón es que...

These sentences also connect two noun phrases; the second noun phrase modifies the first one. However, the verb "ser" connects them, and "ser" does not require the assistance of "de" to do that; in fact, when the preposition "de" immediately follows "ser" it almost always indicates possession:

"Este libro es de María" = "This book is Maria's"
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Why is "el" required in one sentence? Liquinn3 Grammar 2 June 01, 2013 05:49 PM
Why is "el" required in one sentence, but not the other? Liquinn3 Grammar 1 May 23, 2013 08:46 PM
Is "saber" or "conocer" the correct verb in this sentence? Yoodle15 Grammar 3 January 27, 2012 12:57 PM
Should I use "conocer" or "saber" in this sentence? Yoodle15 Grammar 1 January 25, 2012 07:20 AM
Homework help regarding the words "tener", "venir", "preferir", and "querer" cwlcwlspanish Practice & Homework 8 October 08, 2011 07:20 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:29 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X