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De donde hay siempre se puede sacar

 

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not readily apparent based on the individual words in the expression. This forum is dedicated to discussing idioms and other sayings.


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  #1  
Unread May 26, 2010, 06:20 PM
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Lightbulb De donde hay siempre se puede sacar

English?
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  #2  
Unread May 27, 2010, 03:46 AM
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I've heard/seen the opposite, "de donde no hay, no se puede sacar" which in English could be "You can't get blood from a stone". "You can't squeeze blood from a turnip."
In Spanish you could go with something like "donde comen 3 comen 4" or something like that, "donde come uno, comen todos" which in English would be something like, there’s always room for one more at the table. Not quite the same, but somewhat gives the idea. (Let's see if our English friends [native speakers] have something more precise.)
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Unread May 27, 2010, 04:44 AM
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Perfect, thank you Pablo.
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Unread May 28, 2010, 04:24 AM
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My Spanish is still bad, but I'm translating that as, "of where there is always something, you can take?" If I am translating that correctly, then I'm not sure there is an extract translated saying like, "you can't get blood from a stone" as JPablo said.

Remember, my Spanish is still poor, so maybe someone with better Spanish can give a better translation?

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Originally Posted by JPablo View Post
I've heard/seen the opposite, "de donde no hay, no se puede sacar" which in English could be "You can't get blood from a stone". "You can't squeeze blood from a turnip."
In Spanish you could go with something like "donde comen 3 comen 4" or something like that, "donde come uno, comen todos" which in English would be something like, there’s always room for one more at the table. Not quite the same, but somewhat gives the idea. (Let's see if our English friends [native speakers] have something more precise.)
Not quite the same, but if you're looking for a saying, then that's about as good as I could come up with too.

Last edited by AngelicaDeAlquezar; May 28, 2010 at 09:28 AM. Reason: Merged back-to-back posts
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