Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Grammar


When to use the verb "Ser" and when to use "Estar"

 

This is the place for questions about conjugations, verb tenses, adverbs, adjectives, word order, syntax and other grammar questions for English or Spanish.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #81  
Old April 09, 2013, 06:38 PM
Sir Senor Sir Senor is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 26
Native Language: English
Sir Senor is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
Be careful. Some women may find that offensive.
Really?

Also, am I right in think that 'ser' is used to describe a 2nd or 3rd party and 'soy' is for oneself?
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #82  
Old April 09, 2013, 07:00 PM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,455
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
'Ser' is the infinitive. 'Soy' is the first person in the present indicative tense. There are second- and third-person forms, as well. Each person has a singular and a plural form. So, in the present indicative tense, there are six different conjugations of 'ser'.
To wit:

Present Indicative Tense
 Singular Person    Plural Person    
 1st - (yo)  soy  (nosotros, -as)  somos 
 2nd - (tú)  eres  (vosotros, -as)  sois 
 3rd - él  es  ellos  son 
 3rd - ella  es  ellas  son 
 3rd - usted  es  ustedes  son 

The personal pronouns in parentheses are optional because the corresponding conjugation is unique. The third-person personal pronouns are needed to clarify which individual is being referenced/addressed.

The table above is just for the present indicative tense. There are fourteen other conjugation charts for 'ser'. Have a look at a verb conjugation chart here.
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old April 09, 2013, 07:07 PM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,171
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProClifo View Post
Jessica está muy buena ☺☺☺ Hehehehe
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
Be careful. Some women may find that offensive.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Senor View Post
Really?
Sometimes the use of "ser" or "estar" changes the meaning of a sentence.
Saying "Jessica está muy buena" means that she is hot (having a sexual connotation). But if you say "Jessica es muy buena", you mean she's a good person.
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...
Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old April 09, 2013, 07:46 PM
Sir Senor Sir Senor is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 26
Native Language: English
Sir Senor is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
'Ser' is the infinitive. 'Soy' is the first person in the present indicative tense. There are second- and third-person forms, as well. Each person has a singular and a plural form. So, in the present indicative tense, there are six different conjugations of 'ser'.
To wit:

Present Indicative Tense
 Singular Person    Plural Person    
 1st - (yo)  soy  (nosotros, -as)  somos 
 2nd - (tú)  eres  (vosotros, -as)  sois 
 3rd - él  es  ellos  son 
 3rd - ella  es  ellas  son 
 3rd - usted  es  ustedes  son 

The personal pronouns in parentheses are optional because the corresponding conjugation is unique. The third-person personal pronouns are needed to clarify which individual is being referenced/addressed.

The table above is just for the present indicative tense. There are fourteen other conjugation charts for 'ser'. Have a look at a verb conjugation chart here.
I found that slightly confusing at first. I think I understand the basic gist of that now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
Sometimes the use of "ser" or "estar" changes the meaning of a sentence.
Saying "Jessica está muy buena" means that she is hot (having a sexual connotation). But if you say "Jessica es muy buena", you mean she's a good person.
That rings a bell, I think I've heard that before actually. Thanks for explaning
Reply With Quote
  #85  
Old May 27, 2013, 04:39 AM
sigifredo sigifredo is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 5
sigifredo is on a distinguished road
a very usefull summary I guess
thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #86  
Old October 17, 2013, 06:38 AM
mariposa0301 mariposa0301 is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1
mariposa0301 is on a distinguished road
pregunta

Hola a todos

?Alguien sabe si se puede poner "ser" en vez de "estar" en esta frase:

Creo que la pelicula ha estado un poco aburrida a ratos, pero en general ha estado muy bien.

?Podemos decir: Creo que la pelicula ha sido aburrida?
?Cual es la diferencia?

Perdón por la falta de acentos
Reply With Quote
  #87  
Old October 21, 2013, 10:47 AM
pacomartin123 pacomartin123 is offline
Ruby
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 31
pacomartin123 is on a distinguished road
I was a little confused by the translation of "I was cheated".

Because this sounds like a temporary state, my first guess was to use "estar", but I was told to use "ser".

1)Estuve engañado
2)Fuí engañado
3)Me engañaron

Which is the preferred way to say "I was cheated"? Does (1) make any sense at all?
Reply With Quote
  #88  
Old October 21, 2013, 10:58 AM
chileno's Avatar
chileno chileno is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Posts: 7,863
Native Language: Castellano
chileno is on a distinguished road
1)Estuve engañado todos estos años = I was blind all these years

2)Fuí engañado = I was cheated.

3)Me engañaron = They cheated me

Would that help?
Reply With Quote
  #89  
Old October 21, 2013, 03:56 PM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,455
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacomartin123 View Post
I was a little confused by the translation of "I was cheated".

Because this sounds like a temporary state, my first guess was to use "estar", but I was told to use "ser".

1)Estuve engañado
2)Fuí engañado
3)Me engañaron

Which is the preferred way to say "I was cheated"? Does (1) make any sense at all?
This isn't a question about temporary or permanent, which is not a good determiner anyway. You were told to use 'ser' because it is used to directly translate the passive voice into Spanish.
The passive voice is used a lot in English, but not as much in Spanish.

Number 3 is the best option out of the three you gave, but the very best option is to use the impersonal 'se' construct. Next best would be to use the 'pasiva refleja' construct.
Reply With Quote
  #90  
Old October 21, 2013, 03:58 PM
Liquinn3 Liquinn3 is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: England.
Posts: 524
Liquinn3 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
This isn't a question about temporary or permanent, which is not a good determiner anyway. You were told to use 'ser' because it is used to directly translate the passive voice into Spanish.
The passive voice is used a lot in English, but not as much in Spanish.

Number 3 is the best option out of the three you gave, but the very best option is to use the impersonal 'se' construct. Next best would be to use the 'pasiva refleja' construct.
I agree with Rusty. Ser is more to do with the person, such as:
Soy hombre.
Soy inteligente.

Etc etc.

I think of 'Estar' as being to how I'm feeling or what I'm doing in the moment, por ejemplo.

Estoy bien.
Estoy de vacaciones.
Estoy cansando.
Estoy feliz.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

Tags
estar, ser, ser vs estar, vocab comparison, vs

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"We have never spoken/conversed before." vswezie Grammar 7 February 07, 2007 12:14 PM
Help with the verb "REIR" bigjohn Vocabulary 6 February 02, 2007 12:03 PM
Best way to say "pop" Nix Vocabulary 6 May 19, 2006 12:31 PM
¿Cómo se dice "As soon as possible"? vswezie Practice & Homework 5 May 19, 2006 10:05 AM
Ideas on "old school" anthony Vocabulary 1 May 16, 2006 11:02 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:20 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X