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To be "broke" no money / L.AM

 

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  #1  
Old October 23, 2018, 08:56 AM
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To be "broke" no money / L.AM

Hola,

To be broke / no money - temporary, usually (long term is "poor," IMO).

I googled and saw some terms noted for Latin America and Spain.

In Latin America is Estoy limpio / pelado the most common in Mex, Central Am, and the norther part of South America?

Or not?

Are the others?

Thanks if anyone can help.
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  #2  
Old October 23, 2018, 10:52 AM
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I have never heard "estar pelado" in Mexico for not having money, but it would be understood in context. If it's used here, it might be related to the fact that colloquially, money is called "lana" (wool).


"Estar limpio" and "estar rechinando de limpio" are quite common.

You may also find:
- No traer/tener ni (un) quinto. ("Quinto" was the name of old 5 cent coins that haven't been in use for decades, but the expression is still used.)
- No traer/tener ni un clavo.
- No traer/tener ni un varo. ("Varo" is slang for "peso"/"money")
- (Probably only used by elder people) Estar/andar bruja. (To be poor)
- No llegar a fin de mes./No llegar a la quincena. (When you run out of money before the next paycheck at the end of the month or the fortnight.)
- Quedarse sin un centavo/peso. (When you've spent all your money for whatever reason.)
- (More dramatic) No tener ni para comer.
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Old October 23, 2018, 06:51 PM
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There is a direct translation. Broke in Spanish is quebrado. I can be used the same way it's used in English. Me dejó quebrado o ya estoy quebrado.
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Old October 23, 2018, 10:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
I have never heard "estar pelado" in Mexico for not having money, but it would be understood in context. If it's used here, it might be related to the fact that colloquially, money is called "lana" (wool).


"Estar limpio" and "estar rechinando de limpio" are quite common.

You may also find:
- No traer/tener ni (un) quinto. ("Quinto" was the name of old 5 cent coins that haven't been in use for decades, but the expression is still used.)
- No traer/tener ni un clavo.
- No traer/tener ni un varo. ("Varo" is slang for "peso"/"money")
- (Probably only used by elder people) Estar/andar bruja. (To be poor)
- No llegar a fin de mes./No llegar a la quincena. (When you run out of money before the next paycheck at the end of the month or the fortnight.)
- Quedarse sin un centavo/peso. (When you've spent all your money for whatever reason.)
- (More dramatic) No tener ni para comer.
Gracias, Angelica.

El ejemplo "estoy pelado" es from "Spanishdict." It's helpful but can't be trusted as anyone can post an answer there.

Gracias por los ejemplos.
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Old October 23, 2018, 10:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
There is a direct translation. Broke in Spanish is quebrado. I can be used the same way it's used in English. Me dejó quebrado o ya estoy quebrado.
Gracias, poli.

Creo que "quebrar" is a literal meaning as in an object that is broken.


Si?
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Old October 23, 2018, 10:06 PM
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También toma en cuenta que el que yo no lo haya escuchado antes no quiere decir que no se use. La lengua cambia de región en región. De todas formas, se entiende en contexto.

Poli tiene razón: "estar quebrado" también se usa.
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Old October 23, 2018, 10:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aprendo View Post
El ejemplo "estoy pelado" es from "Spanishdict."
She didn't say it, but "Estoy pelado" means "I'm naked," and having no 'lana' on one's person is what makes the phrase understood as "I'm without money." The phrase is used in Spain.
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