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Verb need help

 

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  #1  
Old October 29, 2014, 11:05 PM
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Verb need help

I wondered what "te amo" means..

I love you or You love me?


Me gusta... meaning is I like, i know it

Yo te miro meaning is You look at me according to Bailando - Enrique Iglesias feat Sean Paul song...

So, my conclusion for now, "te amo" means you love me. I know i am wrong.

Can somebody help me with Spanish grammar about verb??


Gracias.
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  #2  
Old October 30, 2014, 04:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yudithcool View Post
I wondered what "te amo" means..

I love you or You love me?


Me gusta... meaning is I like, i know it

Yo te miro meaning is You look at me according to Bailando - Enrique Iglesias feat Sean Paul song...

So, my conclusion for now, "te amo" means you love me. I know i am wrong.

Can somebody help me with Spanish grammar about verb??


Gracias.

You're kind of reading your verbs wrong. "Te amo" does mean "I love you" and "me gusta" does mean "I like you/him/her/it (who or whatever specified).

In the last sentence: Yo=Personal Pronoun(generally omitted), Te=Direct Object, miro=Verb Conjugation(ending dictates the tense like English).... Means "I look at you."

Only practice with the present tense and direct object pronouns to get a feel.
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Old October 30, 2014, 11:52 AM
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Suavemente is right.

The fact that many pronouns in Spanish seem to be the same is confusing, but my advice is that you study them separately. Not all constructions with pronominal particles have the same kind of meanings.

"Te amo" and "me gusta" have very different constructions and must not be confused. Check the conjugations of the verbs for a start: "amo" and "yo" correspond to first person singular, while "me" corresponds to first person singular but "gusta" corresponds to third person singular.

"Yo te amo" structure has a subject, a direct object pronoun and a verb performing the action of the subject.

"Ella me gusta" structure has a subject, an indirect object pronoun and a verb performing the action of the subject.
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Old October 31, 2014, 06:13 AM
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Thanks but still confused.... Can you be more specific??
I'm kinda confused with active voice and passive voice in spanish.


Can you tell me the grammar for passive voice in spanish?
Perhaps it will help a little about this problem
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Old October 31, 2014, 09:08 AM
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There is no passive voice in these expressions. It's a difference between indirect object and direct object.
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Old November 01, 2014, 01:46 AM
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The verb "amar" is commonly translated into English using the verb "to love", while the verb "gustar" is commonly translated into English using the verb "to like". All 4 verbs require 2 participants: a person who likes/loves, and something (or someone) that that person likes.

The English verbs "to like" and "to love" use the same pattern to state the two participants: the person who likes/loves is the subject of the verb, and the something (or someone) that the subject likes is the direct object of the verb.

The verb "amar" (meaning "to love") uses exactly the same pattern as the two English verbs: the sentence "te amo" means "I love you", where "te" is the direct object pronoun for "you" and "amo" is the first-person singular present indicative form of "amar", which means "I love".

The verb "gustar" is different: although we commonly translate sentences that use this verb using "to like", this verb functions more like the English verbs "to please" or "to give pleasure". While in English we say "I like her", if we want to say (almost) the same thing using "to please" or "to give pleasure", we must swap the grammatical roles of "I" and "her" and say either "she pleases me" or "she gives me pleasure".

Just as the English "to please" and "to give pleasure" requires that the thing that pleases/gives pleasure be the subject and that the person who experiences the pleasure be an object of the verb, the Spanish verb "gustar" requires that the thing that one likes be the subject and the person who likes that thing be the indirect object. So, "ella me gusta" = "She pleases me" = "I like her".
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Old November 22, 2014, 12:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrholt View Post

The verb "gustar" is different: although we commonly translate sentences that use this verb using "to like", this verb functions more like the English verbs "to please" or "to give pleasure". While in English we say "I like her", if we want to say (almost) the same thing using "to please" or "to give pleasure", we must swap the grammatical roles of "I" and "her" and say either "she pleases me" or "she gives me pleasure".

.

Ahhh it explains all really helpful.. now i undrstnd it
Thanks all, especially wrholt.
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  #8  
Old December 03, 2014, 06:38 AM
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Several things please me

"Me gustan los perros." Since I am here pleased by several dogs, gustar is conjugated to agree with the number of dogs.
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