#1  
Old May 30, 2009, 03:15 AM
DailyWord DailyWord is offline
Daily Word Posting Robot
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Cyberspace
Posts: 578
DailyWord is on a distinguished road
Fianza

This is a discussion thread for the Daily Spanish Word for May 30, 2009

fianza (feminine noun (la)) — bail, bond, surety, security, deposit. Look up fianza in the dictionary

Su familia tuvo que pagar una fianza para que saliera de la cárcel.
His family had to post bail so he could get out of prison.
__________________
Subscribe to the Daily Spanish Word here.
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old May 30, 2009, 10:24 AM
CrOtALiTo's Avatar
CrOtALiTo CrOtALiTo is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Mérida, Yucatán
Posts: 11,679
Native Language: I can understand Spanish and English
CrOtALiTo is on a distinguished road
Post this word could to be used to say pagar.

Bail meaning Fianza.
__________________
We are building the most important dare for my life and my family feature now we are installing new services in telecoms.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old May 30, 2009, 10:54 AM
Tomisimo's Avatar
Tomisimo Tomisimo is offline
Davidísimo
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: North America
Posts: 5,558
Native Language: American English
Tomisimo will become famous soon enoughTomisimo will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrOtALiTo View Post
Post this word could to be used to say pagar.

Bail meaning Fianza.
To post does not mean pagar. It is only used in certain phrases.
pagar = to pay
pagar una fianza = to post bail
__________________
If you find something wrong with my Spanish, please correct it!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old May 30, 2009, 11:37 AM
Fazor's Avatar
Fazor Fazor is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Middle of Ohio, USA
Posts: 626
Native Language: American English
Fazor is on a distinguished road
Si estoy en prisión, ¿Pagarías mis fianza?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old May 30, 2009, 11:47 AM
irmamar's Avatar
irmamar irmamar is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,071
Native Language: Español
irmamar is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fazor View Post
Si estoy en prisión, ¿Pagarías mis fianza?
Creo que no

También piden una fianza cuando alquilas un piso. Suele ser un mes de alquiler. En ocasiones te piden más, dos meses y hasta tres.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old May 30, 2009, 11:51 AM
Tomisimo's Avatar
Tomisimo Tomisimo is offline
Davidísimo
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: North America
Posts: 5,558
Native Language: American English
Tomisimo will become famous soon enoughTomisimo will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
También piden una fianza cuando alquilas un piso. Suele ser un mes de alquiler. En ocasiones te piden más, dos meses y hasta tres.
And that would be translated as "deposit".
__________________
If you find something wrong with my Spanish, please correct it!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old May 30, 2009, 12:00 PM
irmamar's Avatar
irmamar irmamar is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,071
Native Language: Español
irmamar is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomisimo View Post
And that would be translated as "deposit".
Ok. "Depósito" is also used instead of "fianza". But, "depósito" is most used in banks, not in the sense of "fianza":

He hecho un depósito (o un ingreso) en mi cuenta corriente de 500 €.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old May 30, 2009, 12:18 PM
Tomisimo's Avatar
Tomisimo Tomisimo is offline
Davidísimo
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: North America
Posts: 5,558
Native Language: American English
Tomisimo will become famous soon enoughTomisimo will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Ok. "Depósito" is also used instead of "fianza". But, "depósito" is most used in banks, not in the sense of "fianza":

He hecho un depósito (o un ingreso) en mi cuenta corriente de 500 €.
Yes, it's similar in English. In English you can "make a deposit to your bank account" or when you rent an apartment, you need to "pay a deposit" which is usually the same as one month's rent.
__________________
If you find something wrong with my Spanish, please correct it!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old May 30, 2009, 12:38 PM
irmamar's Avatar
irmamar irmamar is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,071
Native Language: Español
irmamar is on a distinguished road
Thanks. Another word makes me think: "bond". Would you mind to give some examples with "bond"?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old May 30, 2009, 01:12 PM
laepelba's Avatar
laepelba laepelba is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Suburbs of Washington, DC (Northern Virginia)
Posts: 4,683
Native Language: American English (Northeastern US)
laepelba is on a distinguished road
There are several uses for the word "bond". The financial ways as discussed - when a "bail bond" is paid, with the understanding that if the accused does not come back for his/her court date, that the amount of bond money paid will not be given back.

Then there are stocks and bonds. That has to do with investments ... and I certainly can't speak about that ... I know absolutely nothing about that. But you hear the term "junk bonds" or "savings bonds" and they have to do with investing money and earning back interest.

Then there is "bond" that has to do with attaching something to something else. It can be a physical attachment, like when super-glue is used to "bond" two things together permanently. In this sense "bond" is even used to describe a chemical attachment of two atoms being "bonded" together by an electrical force. Or it can be more emotional - like the "bond" between a mother and child.

The attachment idea of the word "bond" can also be used in regards to "chains" - for example, a shackle might bind a prisoner to a cell wall.

Finally, my favorite, there is James Bond. Double-oh-seven. 007. Bond. James Bond. Yeah.
__________________
- Lou Ann, de Washington, DC, USA
Específicamente quiero recibir ayuda con el español de latinoamerica. ¡Muchísimas gracias!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

Tags
bail, bond, deposit, security, surety

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:04 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X