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A little + noun

 

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  #1  
Old May 03, 2019, 01:38 AM
fglorca fglorca is offline
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A little + noun

How would 'We are a little afraid of this monster' be translated?

Tenemos miedo de este monstruo' doesn't really convey the meaning of 'a little'.

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  #2  
Old May 03, 2019, 05:57 AM
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Tengo un poquito miedo de ...
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Old May 03, 2019, 07:04 AM
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Este monstruo nos da (algo/un poco/un poquito/un poquitito) de miedo

There you have all the gradation from "a little" to "a bit". In some regions "un poco" is said "una poca" -though rarely in this context but when real quantities are implied- and "poquitito" is said "poquitico"
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Old May 03, 2019, 12:12 PM
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This is what I like about Tomísimo. Alec notes the fine point difference between poquitico and poquitito. I wonder if this is strictly an Argentinian fine point, though. I'm clearly not a native speaker, but where I live much Spanish spoken is Caribbean, and I know that coastal Colombia uses 'ico suffix all the time, and it differenciates them from nations close by.
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Old May 04, 2019, 02:44 AM
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The -ico suffix is also heavily used in Costa Rica.
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Old May 04, 2019, 03:18 AM
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I meant the comment between hyphens to be applied to poco and poca.



Costa Ricans are known as ticos because their extended use of the suffix -ico.
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