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Es más listo que el hambre

 

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not readily apparent based on the individual words in the expression. This forum is dedicated to discussing idioms and other sayings.


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  #1  
Old May 15, 2010, 12:58 AM
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Lightbulb Es más listo que el hambre

In English?
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  #2  
Old May 15, 2010, 01:20 AM
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He is razor sharp.
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Old May 15, 2010, 08:01 AM
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Quote:
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He is razor sharp.
When was the word "razor" first used in the English language?
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Old May 15, 2010, 08:12 AM
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"Razor" is from Middle English "rasour" from Anglo-French "rasur", and apparently came into use
in English sometime after the Norman invasion of England in 1066. Merriam Webster gives 14th century.
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Old May 15, 2010, 11:29 AM
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In addition to Perikles' excellent suggestion, you can also say "to be as smart as they come."
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Old May 15, 2010, 12:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hermit View Post
"Razor" is from Middle English "rasour" from Anglo-French "rasur", and apparently came into use
in English sometime after the Norman invasion of England in 1066. Merriam Webster gives 14th century.
I couldn't get the date in Merriam, just Middle English.

Yes, for us rasurar(afeitar) = shave

Thanks.
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Old May 16, 2010, 03:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hermit View Post
"Razor" is from Middle English "rasour" from Anglo-French "rasur", and apparently came into use
in English sometime after the Norman invasion of England in 1066. Merriam Webster gives 14th century.
Presumably, that came from Latin rasus, past participle of radere: to scrape, shave, with associated words arrasar, arrastrar, rallar, ras, rascacielos, rascar, rasurar, etc.
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Old May 16, 2010, 04:59 AM
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Under Onelook Dictionary Search, Merriam Webster's Online Dictionary,
11th edition, says 14th century. That Onelook site is great...
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Old May 16, 2010, 06:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hermit View Post
Under Onelook Dictionary Search, Merriam Webster's Online Dictionary,
11th edition, says 14th century. That Onelook site is great...
Thanks for the link - it looks extremely useful. The reverse dictionary function could be useful as well. You type in your definition, and it comes up with suggestions for the word. Sometimes.
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Old May 16, 2010, 07:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
Presumably, that came from Latin rasus, past participle of radere: to scrape, shave, with associated words arrasar, arrastrar, rallar, ras, rascacielos, rascar, rasurar, etc.
Correct, I imagine.

I would imagine also, that rasurar is closer to "ras" thence "rasar".
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