#21  
Old August 20, 2009, 10:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Actually, we say the same thing in English. "That guy is a gem!" Depending on the TONE (which is of utmost importance for this phrase), it could either mean (1) that the guy is truly a fabulous and wonderful person, or (2) that the guy is such a loser that you need a euphemism to describe him....
If I'm not mistaken it's never positive in Spanish.
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  #22  
Old August 20, 2009, 10:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
Tío in Spain is like bloke in England. Most Americans will understand the word bloke but never use it unless they want to sound British. Most latinos understand tío to mean guy/bloke, but don't use it because it sounds continental. From what I can tell, to latinos tio means uncle y nada más sino en Peru donde tío significa vejestorio.
En Puerto Rico no usan alaja en un modo despectivo, pero perla es la palabra.
Este hombre es una perla.--is no compliment.
Thanks ... my best friend is Peruvian. So ..... I assume that in Peru, tio doesn't ALWAYS mean vejestorio. Right? Because my friend's son calls several of his father's friends "Tio Joe" or whatever....
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  #23  
Old August 20, 2009, 11:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Thanks ... my best friend is Peruvian. So ..... I assume that in Peru, tio doesn't ALWAYS mean vejestorio. Right? Because my friend's son calls several of his father's friends "Tio Joe" or whatever....
It mean uncle first. But some guy who's un tío is an old fellow.
In Spain it means guy or dude
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Old August 20, 2009, 11:10 AM
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Okay here is my

Joya and Alaja are synonyms....

I have heard people use....
-Alaja when referring to a ring, watch, chain, medallion, etc.
-Joya usually is referred to a precious stone or precious jewelry item.

Which I think we have discussed this before, brings us to the use of....
alaja ..... alajero....for Jewelry Box
joya....... joyero....for jeweler.

Please remember........I am not saying that is the correct way of saying things. I am just saying this is what I have heard and have had the experience of using.

Please don't kill the messenger....

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Old August 20, 2009, 11:19 AM
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Thanks, Elaina ... those distinctions are helpful!

And "joyería" for jewelry store, right?
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  #26  
Old August 20, 2009, 11:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Thanks, Elaina ... those distinctions are helpful!

And "joyería" for jewelry store, right?

Yes...

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  #27  
Old August 20, 2009, 01:04 PM
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Esas joyas/alhojas son muy ricas, pero ten cuidad, algunas son falsas. No puedas tu confianza en los ladrones que quieren robarte.
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Old August 20, 2009, 01:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by María José View Post
When we say (slang):'Este tío es una alhaja', we mean exactly the opposite: a bum, a loser...
En español mexicano, para hablar de alguien con mala reputación: "ese tipo es una (verdadera) joya/joyita"
(Diminutive adds even more contempt).



Quote:
Originally Posted by bobjenkins View Post
Esas joyas/alhojas son muy ricas caras/lujosas , pero ten cuidado, algunas son falsas. No puedas pongas tu confianza en los ladrones que quieren robarte. /no confíes en los ladrones que quieren robarte / no puedes confiar en los ladrones....
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  #29  
Old August 20, 2009, 03:23 PM
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Another word: bisutería. In English it is costume jewellery.
BTW, there is a Spanish brand of jewellery that I love (some people hate it because they think it is very posh). Their most representative piece is a bear. The brand name is Tous.

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  #30  
Old August 20, 2009, 06:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by María José View Post
Another word: bisutería. In English it is costume jewellery.
BTW, there is a Spanish brand of jewellery that I love (some people hate it because they think it is very posh). Their most representative piece is a bear. The brand name is Tous.

Me enseñaste la palabra empalagosa, me no me dejas olvidarla
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