#21  
Old October 15, 2009, 08:43 AM
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Irmamar is in the correct about the Gafas here in my country is likely used that word.

Now, after my doctor said me before that when I'm headache should use the glasses now that I need it because as I'm constantly behind of a monitor my eyes result sometimes with a kind to pain, but here after the post the glasses doesn't used when you're headache.
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  #22  
Old October 15, 2009, 09:18 AM
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Yes, I have heard of anteojos. People I know call sunglasses gafas
and regular glasses lentes. I have learned today that these terms are interchangable, but, depending upon the region, their meanings change slightly.
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  #23  
Old October 15, 2009, 09:36 AM
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@Elaina: "anteojos" in Mexico is an old-fashioned word, but it's clearly understood as frame glasses. └O-O┘
"Lentes" (masculin, plural) is the most popular word around here for them.

"Lentes de contacto" are contact glasses.

"Lente" in singular, either feminin or masculin, is used the way Irma has described.


For many years almost nobody used "gafas", but now the younger people tend to use that word for sunglasses. Most of us still rather say "lentes oscuros" though.



Now I have a question: When I go to check my eyes, I get prescription glasses with different diopter adjustment. The number of diopters is called "graduación". What is the word in English for this "graduación"?
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Old October 15, 2009, 10:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
Now I have a question: When I go to check my eyes, I get prescription glasses with different diopter adjustment. The number of diopters is called "graduación". What is the word in English for this "graduación"?
I imagine it is simply called 'strength', a strength of 2 diopters, say. Or grade? The value is the inverse of the focal length of the lens in metres, so the higher the number, the 'stronger' are the lenses. I am just guessing at the word, though.
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Old October 15, 2009, 10:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
@Elaina: "anteojos" in Mexico is an old-fashioned word, but it's clearly understood as frame glasses. └O-O┘
"Lentes" (masculin, plural) is the most popular word around here for them.

"Lentes de contacto" are contact glasses.

"Lente" in singular, either feminin or masculin, is used the way Irma has described.


For many years almost nobody used "gafas", but now the younger people tend to use that word for sunglasses. Most of us still rather say "lentes oscuros" though.



Now I have a question: When I go to check my eyes, I get prescription glasses with different diopter adjustment. The number of diopters is called "graduación". What is the word in English for this "graduación"?
Graduation is the word, but it is a rather technical word.
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  #26  
Old October 15, 2009, 11:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
I imagine it is simply called 'strength', a strength of 2 diopters, say. Or grade? The value is the inverse of the focal length of the lens in metres, so the higher the number, the 'stronger' are the lenses. I am just guessing at the word, though.
Informally "strength" is the word used. I dug through the piles of paper on my desk but I can't find my latest prescription to check the wording used on that.

Hmm, over two years since I saw an optician. I should make an appointment.
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Old October 15, 2009, 11:46 AM
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I've heard "anteojos" with the sense of "prismáticos" (binoculars, I think). It is also an old fashioned word, as Angélica said. (I think Quevedo wore anteojos)
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Old October 15, 2009, 12:29 PM
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Después de leer tres páginaS ya olvido la palabra original .
Tengo un lente para que pueda ver fácilmente lo que estoy haciendo al constuir/fabricar los penqueñisimos modelos de coches. (magnifying glass/lense)

Hoy el sol es muy brillo me duele los ojos, ¿Dónde están mis gafas de sol?
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Old October 15, 2009, 12:30 PM
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I associate "anteojos" with glasses without the bits to hold them onto your ears (how do you say "patillas" in English?). So, like Irmamar said, Quevedo used to wear them.
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  #30  
Old October 15, 2009, 12:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
@Elaina: "anteojos" in Mexico is an old-fashioned word, but it's clearly understood as frame glasses. └O-O┘
"Lentes" (masculin, plural) is the most popular word around here for them.

"Lentes de contacto" are contact glasses. "Lente" in singular, either feminin or masculin, is used the way Irma has described.


For many years almost nobody used "gafas", but now the younger people tend to use that word for sunglasses. Most of us still rather say "lentes oscuros" though.
Interesting - Rosetta Stone Latin American Spanish uses "anteojos de sol" for sunglasses. I used that term with my friend from Uruguay and she didn't correct me. I wonder if it's quite regional.

By the way, Malila, we would say "contact lenses".

Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
Now I have a question: When I go to check my eyes, I get prescription glasses with different diopter adjustment. The number of diopters is called "graduación". What is the word in English for this "graduación"?
Are you referring to two different prescriptions in the same lens? That is "bifocals". As far as the prescription strength changing when you go to an appointment for new glasses, I don't know a technical term for that. It's just a prescription strength. It's usually given as a positive or negative number, often with a decimal value.
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