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Call In Sick

 

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  #1  
Old May 25, 2023, 08:39 PM
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Call In Sick

I need a short, concise way to say: I'm going to call in sick tomorrow.

I know there are lots of ways to say it by indicating that I'm going to call and then describing the reason for the call, but I would like something simple and concise.

So will either of these be understood and convey what I'm trying to say?

Voy a reportarme enfermo mañana.

Voy a llamar enfermo mañana.


If not, please give me alternatives.
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  #2  
Old May 25, 2023, 10:15 PM
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Such a sentence would only be used if you are now sick and are announcing your plan to let someone at work know you won't be coming in.
The 'call in' part isn't necessary. That's what we say in English.

Mañana voy a decir que estoy enfermo/enferma.
Voy a dar parte de enfermo mañana.

When you call in to work, a simple «Estoy enfermo/enferma» explains everything.

Don't use reportarse with the meaning of 'informar/comunicar/avisar/anunciar/decir' (it means 'show up').
You can't use «llamar enfermo».
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  #3  
Old May 26, 2023, 07:24 PM
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Thank you for responding, Rusty.

I will use "dar parte de enfermo." That is concise and easy for me to remember.
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Old May 27, 2023, 07:06 PM
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"Reportarse enfermo" is the common expression in Mexico.
I understand this is not the best usage of the verb "reportar", but this is how we say it.

- No tengo ganas de ir a trabajar. Me voy a reportar enfermo.
- Juan no vino a trabajar. Se reportó enfermo.
- ¿Me puedes explicar cómo es que te reportaste enferma, y acabas de subir fotos de la playa a tus redes sociales?
- No me siento bien. Voy a decirle al jefe que estoy enfermo y que no voy a ir a trabajar.
- Laura dijo que estaba enferma y no vino a trabajar, pero no ha enviado ningún justificante médico.

Of course, while we use "reportarse enfermo" as the informal way to call in sick, "dar parte", is when you're doing a very formal report.
And although I've never heard the expression "dar parte de enfermo", in Mexico this would need to fill in forms and request medical documents to justify your absence at work, or to get your insurance cover your expenses.


Side note: We also use "reportarse" as a way to say we're calling/seeing someone who is expecting our call/visit. We don't need documents, the person just has to call or show up.
- Hola, Roberto, me estoy reportando a tu llamada. -> I missed a call from you and I'm calling you back.
- Repórtate con el jefe. Preguntó por ti en la mañana. -> Go to the boss's office. He asked where you were early in the morning.
- María no se ha reportado y estoy esperando su informe. -> Maria should have finished her job and I haven't heard from her or seen her.
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Old May 27, 2023, 10:13 PM
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Thank you, AngelicadeAlquezar.

Since the person/people who would receive my call where I volunteer are mostly from Mexico and/or Guatemala, I will use "reportarse enfermo."

As always, I appreciate your explanations and examples. I know it takes a lot of time for you to think of them and then write them, but they really help me.

Again, I appreciate you and Rusty for responding to my question.
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  #6  
Old May 28, 2023, 09:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
"Reportarse enfermo" is the common expression in Mexico.
I understand this is not the best usage of the verb "reportar", but this is how we say it.

- No tengo ganas de ir a trabajar. Me voy a reportar enfermo.
- Juan no vino a trabajar. Se reportó enfermo.
- ¿Me puedes explicar cómo es que te reportaste enferma, y acabas de subir fotos de la playa a tus redes sociales?
- No me siento bien. Voy a decirle al jefe que estoy enfermo y que no voy a ir a trabajar.
- Laura dijo que estaba enferma y no vino a trabajar, pero no ha enviado ningún justificante médico.

Of course, while we use "reportarse enfermo" as the informal way to call in sick, "dar parte", is when you're doing a very formal report.
And although I've never heard the expression "dar parte de enfermo", in Mexico this would need to fill in forms and request medical documents to justify your absence at work, or to get your insurance cover your expenses.


Side note: We also use "reportarse" as a way to say we're calling/seeing someone who is expecting our call/visit. We don't need documents, the person just has to call or show up.
- Hola, Roberto, me estoy reportando a tu llamada. -> I missed a call from you and I'm calling you back.
- Repórtate con el jefe. Preguntó por ti en la mañana. -> Go to the boss's office. He asked where you were early in the morning.
- María no se ha reportado y estoy esperando su informe. -> Maria should have finished her job and I haven't heard from her or seen her.
I totally agree!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobbert View Post
I need a short, concise way to say: I'm going to call in sick tomorrow.

I know there are lots of ways to say it by indicating that I'm going to call and then describing the reason for the call, but I would like something simple and concise.

So will either of these be understood and convey what I'm trying to say?

Voy a reportarme enfermo mañana.

Voy a llamar enfermo mañana.


If not, please give me alternatives.
"Voy a reportarme enfermo mañana" is a short correct way to say it.

As a side note, I'm not sure if that happens everywhere, but in Canada, when people "call in sick", it's simply because they are NOT actually sick, but they don't want to work that day for whatever reason. In addition, in most of the cases, that happens on Fridays or Mondays. Weird, right?

Last edited by Rusty; May 28, 2023 at 02:53 PM. Reason: merged back-to-back posts
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  #7  
Old May 28, 2023, 04:50 PM
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@Bobbert: No problem! It's actually fun most of the time.

@Gaboch: When someone doesn't go to work on Monday in Mexico, we assume they didn't want to go rather than they're sick, and we use the expression "hacer San Lunes", which means they used Monday like a religious holiday.
- Hoy no fui a trabajar. Hice San Lunes.
- Pedro no ha llegado a la oficina. Yo creo que hizo San Lunes.
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