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Old April 27, 2008, 10:15 PM
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Vaso

This is a discussion thread for the Daily Spanish Word for April 26, 2008

vaso - masculine noun (el), glass, cup. Look up vaso in the dictionary

Tu dices que el vaso está medio lleno, y yo digo que está medio vacío.
You say the glass is half full and I say it's half empty.
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Old April 28, 2008, 03:05 AM
Alfonso Alfonso is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DailyWord View Post
Tu dices que el vaso está medio lleno, y yo digo que está medio vacío.
You say the glass is half full and I say it's half empty.
En español es más habitual decir: puedes ver la botella medio llena o medio vacía.
Con vaso, se puede decir: ... esta es la gota que rebosa/colma el vaso. I don't know how to translate this into English. Any idea?
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Old April 28, 2008, 03:07 AM
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No es por llevar la contraria, pero yo siempre he dicho el vaso medio vacío...
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Old April 28, 2008, 03:11 AM
Alfonso Alfonso is offline
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Bueno, Iris, tú nunca llevas la contraria . Es que tú bebes de vaso en vaso. Yo, en cambio, aprecio que la botella siempre está medio vacía.
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Old April 28, 2008, 03:15 AM
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And I thought you were an optimist... What's the meaning of bebes de vaso en vaso?
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Old April 28, 2008, 03:18 AM
Alfonso Alfonso is offline
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Yes, I'm an optimist drunker .
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Old April 28, 2008, 05:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfonso View Post
Con vaso, se puede decir: ... esta es la gota que rebosa/colma el vaso. I don't know how to translate this into English. Any idea?
esta es la gota que rebosa/colma el vaso = the straw that broke the camel's back

Quote:
What's the meaning of bebes de vaso en vaso?
de vaso en vaso = from glass to glass
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Old April 28, 2008, 08:57 AM
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Another way to say beber de vaso en vaso is 'to drink glass after glass.'
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Old April 28, 2008, 11:56 AM
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Thanks for the input on if it's a glass or a bottle that's half full / half empty. This reminds me that linguistically, we each have what is called an ideolect, our own personal version of the language we speak.

An example of ideolect is for me personally is the following

I don't know whether to go on vacation.
I don't know whether to go on vacation or not.


For me personally, the first one is wrong, and the second is the only right way to say it. But there are native English speakers who will disagree with me.

-----------

In regards to the terms drunker, drunkard and drinker.

drunker is the comparative:
I'm drunker than she is.
Estoy más emborrachado que ella.

drunkard = borracho (you can also use drunk)
He's a drunkard.
He's a drunk.
El es borracho.

drinker refers to someone who drinks (usually speaking of alcoholic beverages) This does not imply that the person is a drunk or drunkard.
She's a social drinker.
He's a light drinker.
Alfonso's an optimistic drinker.
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Old April 28, 2008, 12:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomisimo View Post
Thanks for the input on if it's a glass or a bottle that's half full / half empty. This reminds me that linguistically, we each have what is called an ideolect, our own personal version of the language we speak.

An example of ideolect is for me personally is the following

I don't know whether to go on vacation.
I don't know whether to go on vacation or not. you can certainly say. "I don't know whether or not to go on vacation"-- it's more gramatically correct because it doesn't split the preposition.



For me personally, the first one is wrong, and the second is the only right way to say it. But there are native English speakers who will disagree with me.

-----------

In regards to the terms drunker, drunkard and drinker.

drunker is the comparative:
I'm drunker than she is.
Estoy más emborrachado que ella.

drunkard = borracho (you can also use drunk)
He's a drunkard.
He's a drunk.
El es borracho.

drinker refers to someone who drinks (usually speaking of alcoholic beverages) This does not imply that the person is a drunk or drunkard.
She's a social drinker.
He's a light drinker.
Alfonso's an optimistic drinker.
All these details can turn him into a pessimistic drinker.
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botella, bottle, couple, glass, pair, par, vaso

 

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