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Patterns of variation between men and women speakers

 

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  #1  
Old September 09, 2010, 06:01 AM
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Patterns of variation between men and women speakers

May book says that there are patterns of variation in language between the English speakers according to their sex. For instance, the author says that schoolgirls in Scotland seem to pronounce the /t/ in words like water, while boys prefer a glottal stop (Wardhaugh, 2002). Trudgill (1972) says that in a study carried out in Norwich, he found that women tended to be more conservative in terms of language than men, who used to show more language change.

What do you think? Do you agree with these statements?

Thank you.
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Old September 09, 2010, 06:47 AM
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Yes. This is especially apparent among young people. In the United States young women (often upper middle class) speak in a sing-song jargon called valley talk. I sounds almost Mandarin or Madrid Castillian. I think if bacame popular because it is easily heard on mobile phones. Very few men talk valley.

As far a the glottal stop for water among Scots is concerned, I have heard Scottish women using it. Pronouncing the t in
water is higher class.
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Old September 09, 2010, 07:01 AM
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It's difficult to generalize. My daughter speaks with an irritating habit of finishing every sentence several notes higher than the rest of the sentence, as do all her girlfriends, but her husband doesn't, and neither does my son. This is without any noticeable regional accent. Why is this?
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Old September 09, 2010, 07:05 AM
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I have noticed this in young women in the Stats too. It must be an international phenomenon, though I doubt it has reached the Phillipines.
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Old September 09, 2010, 08:21 AM
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I'd like to listen to some sentence ending with that high pitch.
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Old September 09, 2010, 08:57 AM
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Look here:
http://www.ehow.com/how_2041258_talk...lley-girl.html

I do not endorse this accent.
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Old September 09, 2010, 09:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
I do not endorse this accent.
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Speak with what linguists call a high rising terminal. That means end your sentences with a rising intonation. It's as if you're asking a question with every statement you make.
Oh my god - that's exactly how my daughter speaks. How is that possible when it comes from California? My guess is that it is too much rubbish television.
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Old September 09, 2010, 10:06 AM
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Yes, I fear this renegade accent has invaded Great Britain. It may be the
first class-driven non-regional accent. I agree. It is awful. I hope this
phenomenon with be self-limiting, and future generations will laugh at their
grandmother's valspeak.
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Old September 09, 2010, 10:21 AM
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Is it just girls/women? I've heard plenty of females speak like this, but never any males. If this is generally true, why ??
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Old September 09, 2010, 10:39 AM
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This coincides with Irmamar's question about whether there are distinct
speech patterns between men and women in the English language. Valspeak came to mind immediately. Few men use it.
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