Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Grammar


Dos preguntas; "arriba" y "a"

 

This is the place for questions about conjugations, verb tenses, adverbs, adjectives, word order, syntax and other grammar questions for English or Spanish.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old September 01, 2008, 07:52 AM
ElDanés's Avatar
ElDanés ElDanés is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 318
ElDanés is on a distinguished road
Dos preguntas; "arriba" y "a"

Today I saw a headline in the Mexican newspaper, Reforma, that said, Arriba 'Gustav' a Luisiana. I couldn't really translate it, as two things troubled me: arriba and a. I found the translation of arriba pretty quick, and figured out the sentence must mean, 'Gustav' is above Louisiana. But I would still like to know why arriba is in the front of the subject - and also exactly how a is used. I've read the entry on a in the wiki, but I don't really feel it helps me. Could someone explain its use, together with examples?

¡Gracias!
__________________
¡Correcciones son muy bienvenidas!
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old September 01, 2008, 09:20 AM
Tomisimo's Avatar
Tomisimo Tomisimo is offline
Davidísimo
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: North America
Posts: 5,565
Native Language: American English
Tomisimo will become famous soon enoughTomisimo will become famous soon enough
Arriba means above and a means to in most cases. But in this case, arriba comes from the verb arribar, meaning to arrive.

Arriba Gustav a Luisiana
Llega Gustav a Luisiana
El huracán Gustav llega al estado de Luisiana
__________________
If you find something wrong with my Spanish, please correct it!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old September 01, 2008, 09:22 AM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,623
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElDanés View Post
Today I saw a headline in the Mexican newspaper, Reforma, that said, Arriba 'Gustav' a Luisiana. I couldn't really translate it, as two things troubled me: arriba and a. I found the translation of arriba pretty quick, and figured out the sentence must mean, 'Gustav' is above Louisiana. But I would still like to know why arriba is in the front of the subject - and also exactly how a is used. I've read the entry on a in the wiki, but I don't really feel it helps me. Could someone explain its use, together with examples?

¡Gracias!
Arriba means 'to reach port/nearing the shore/arrives'. The 'a' just means 'at'. So, 'Gustav arrives at Louisiana' is a good translation.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old September 01, 2008, 10:32 AM
ElDanés's Avatar
ElDanés ElDanés is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 318
ElDanés is on a distinguished road
Ah, that explains everything. I didn't even think about checking whether it was a verb or not, I guess I should pay more attention next time. Thank you for the examples, Tomísimo, and thanks for clearing up the a in this context, Rusty!

So, the a, when used as a personal pronoun, does only refer to persons (or personifized objects), except for the few exception, like the entry in the wiki correctly states. I was getting confused as I read a as the pronoun, and I just couldn't get it right.

Edit: I read somewhere on the internet that the VS-order used in the headline isn't as common as the normal SV-order, and that it's used to emphasize an action, in this case, arriba, is this correct?
__________________
¡Correcciones son muy bienvenidas!

Last edited by ElDanés; September 01, 2008 at 10:35 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old September 01, 2008, 11:02 AM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,623
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Subject-verb order isn't as strict in Spanish as it is in English. The verb can, and frequently does precede the subject. Here, in the headline, both V-S-O and S-V-O orders would have worked but perhaps, as you mentioned, putting the verb first gives emphasis to the action.

The personal 'a', as you have most likely learned, doesn't translate to any English word. It just needs to be used in Spanish. The prepositional 'a' that follows many verbs, like llegar a (to arrive at) or asistir a (to attend) may or may not translate directly into English. The preposition 'a' can be translated as 'at', 'to', 'for', 'on', 'in', etc. There's no easy rule. A good dictionary will translate awkward phrases, like 'at 1:00 p.m.' and 'on time' correctly (both use the preposition 'a' in Spanish).

Last edited by Rusty; September 01, 2008 at 11:10 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old September 01, 2008, 11:05 AM
ElDanés's Avatar
ElDanés ElDanés is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 318
ElDanés is on a distinguished road
Thanks once again, Rusty!

I've ordered a book on Spanish grammar on the internet some days ago, and I just borrowed another one from the local library today, so hopefully they can explain the usage even further.

I should really start using the reputation system - all of you guys are so helpful, I just forget about it all the time.
__________________
¡Correcciones son muy bienvenidas!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

Tags
arribar

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
When to use the verb "Ser" and when to use "Estar" Tomisimo Grammar 105 June 12, 2014 02:55 PM
"Reinaba" - home work from school 2nd grade el chingon Vocabulary 2 April 09, 2008 08:43 AM
Como Puedo Decir???? - "Me encanta ver feliz a Rosa" Copy Vocabulary 4 January 14, 2008 03:22 PM
el imperfecto con "que" y con preguntas gramatica Grammar 6 December 13, 2007 10:46 AM
When to use the verb "IR" and when to use "VENIR" hermione Grammar 11 October 24, 2007 08:44 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:14 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X