Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Vocabulary


"tener pena" vs. "dar pena"

 

Ask about definitions or translations for Spanish or English words.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old March 17, 2010, 07:50 AM
NiCACHiCA's Avatar
NiCACHiCA NiCACHiCA is offline
Ruby
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 63
Native Language: English
NiCACHiCA is on a distinguished road
You guys are awesome!!! And I'm sure everyone around the forum thanks you often, but really, thank you so much for taking the time to help the beginners like me!! Some days I wonder if I'll ever get where I want to be with Spanish. But I know it's a life-long process! THANKS AGAIN!

Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post

"Darle pena a alguien":

- Me da pena (me da vergüenza) que me veas así. -> I'm embarrased that you see me like this.
- Le dio pena (le dio vergüenza) no poder ayudarme y se fue. -> He was sorry that he couldn't help me and he left.
- El vagabundo me dio pena (me dio lástima) y le di una limosna. -> I took pity on the homless man and I gave him some money.
- Cuando murió el abuelo todos sentimos pena (sentimos lástima) por la abuela, que estaba tan triste. -> When grandfather died we all felt sorry for grandmother, who was so sad.
On the second example, does "sorry" mean he was embarrassed that he couldn't help you and that's why he left? Or that maybe he was in a hurry or had an appointment and was sorry he couldn't stay to help? And would there be a difference in words used between the two scenarios?

And I don't mean to start a whole other discussion, but those questions bring up something that I encountered last night talking to a Nicaraguan friend. Her husband is sick with the flu and I told her to tell him "lo siento" because in the US when someone is sick, we always say I'm sorry (not even sure why we say that! haha). Well, she laughed at me and started to explain that lo siento is not used for that, but she never really explained it. I woke up this morning thinking about it and decided I'd ask my friends here if they could shed some light on the issue!

Last edited by NiCACHiCA; March 17, 2010 at 07:54 AM.
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #12  
Old March 17, 2010, 08:08 AM
bobjenkins's Avatar
bobjenkins bobjenkins is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: España próximamente??
Posts: 2,923
Native Language: Inglés
bobjenkins is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
Your sentence is not exactly wrong, but:

When the subject is the same, the second verb is not conjugated: Me siento avergonzado de haberme portado así.

When the subject is different, the second verb is conjugated in subjunctive:
- Me siento avergonzado de que mi hermano se portara así.
- Me avergüenza que mi hermano se haya portado así.
- Me siento avergonzado de que mi hermano se haya portado así.
- Me avergüenza que mi hermano se portara así.


GRacias. Sé que es normal de escribir así, pero he visto unos casos distintos en los que se escribe de otra manera . De vez en cuando estoy confundido sobre eso.

Quote:
Espero que yo pueda hacerlo tarde
¿Hay reglas? espero que haya solamente unos pocos de casos así porque puede ser confundido
__________________
"There´s always money in the banana stand michael!"
--george bluthe sir
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old March 17, 2010, 12:19 PM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,314
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by NiCACHiCA View Post
On the second example, does "sorry" mean he was embarrassed that he couldn't help you and that's why he left? Or that maybe he was in a hurry or had an appointment and was sorry he couldn't stay to help? And would there be a difference in words used between the two scenarios?
The sentence:
Quote:
Le dio pena (le dio vergüenza) no poder ayudarme y se fue. -> He was sorry that he couldn't help me and he left.
means that he found there was nothing he could to to help (and felt ashamed or useless) and he decided to leave.


If he had been in a hurry, the sentence would have been explicit about it:
Quote:
Le dio pena tener que irse y no poder quedarse a ayudarme. -> He was sorry that he had to go and couldn't stay to help me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NiCACHiCA View Post
And I don't mean to start a whole other discussion, but those questions bring up something that I encountered last night talking to a Nicaraguan friend. Her husband is sick with the flu and I told her to tell him "lo siento" because in the US when someone is sick, we always say I'm sorry (not even sure why we say that! haha). Well, she laughed at me and started to explain that lo siento is not used for that, but she never really explained it. I woke up this morning thinking about it and decided I'd ask my friends here if they could shed some light on the issue!
Although you can say "siento (mucho) que tu esposo esté enfermo" [I'm sorry that you'r husband is ill], "lo siento" may be felt too formal... It's often heard when someone dies and one says comfort word to relatives, or when one is apologizing for something wrong one has done.

- Lo siento. No volveré a insultarte. -> I'm sorry. I'll never insult you again.
- Supe que tu hermano murió. Lo siento mucho. -> I heard your brother has died. I'm very sorry (for you).


If your friend's husband is sick, you can say:

- Qué lástima. Ojalá se recupere pronto. -> It's a shame. Hopefully he'll recover soon.
- ¡Pobre! Espero que se sienta mejor. -> Poor him! I hope he'll be feeling better.
- ¡Qué barbaridad! Ojalá que pronto esté bien. -> That's terrible! I hope he'll be alright soon.



Quote:
Originally Posted by bobjenkins View Post
GRacias. Sé que es normal de escribir común que se escriba así, pero he visto unos casos distintos en los que se escribe de otra manera . De vez en cuando A veces estoy me siento confundido sobre eso.

("De vez en cuando" is rather used for something that has been intended or some irregular habit: "De vez en cuando paseo en bicicleta". For something that just happens, "a veces" sounds better.)

¿Hay reglas? espero que haya solamente unos pocos de casos no haya muchos casos/espero que haya pocos casos así porque puede ser confundido confuso.

Ojo: "Unos pocos" is exclusively used when "pocos" is a substantive.

- Creí que habría muchos fans esperando autógrafos, pero sólo había unos pocos. -> I thought there would be many fans waiting for autographs, but there were just a few.
- Tenía muchas monedas, pero ya sólo me quedan unas pocas. -> I used to have many coins, but now I only have a few.
It's true that many people use the subjunctive with the same subject, but the sentences sound clumsy. Infinitive is definitely better.
If there is a formal rule, is what I've said before: "same person => infinitive", "different person => subjunctive".

Espero poder hacerlo más tarde. ->I hope I can do it later.
Espero que puedas hacerlo más tarde. -> I hope you can do it later.
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old March 17, 2010, 07:17 PM
bobjenkins's Avatar
bobjenkins bobjenkins is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: España próximamente??
Posts: 2,923
Native Language: Inglés
bobjenkins is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
It's true that many people use the subjunctive with the same subject, but the sentences sound clumsy. Infinitive is definitely better.
If there is a formal rule, is what I've said before: "same person => infinitive", "different person => subjunctive".

Espero poder hacerlo más tarde. ->I hope I can do it later.
Espero que puedas hacerlo más tarde. -> I hope you can do it later.

Muchas gracias por aclararlo y las correcciones!
Así es más simple

Espero tener mucho éxito en mi aprendizaje

PD: sustantivos son las cosas que son concretas, ¿verdadero?



 español  inglés 
 Pensaba tener muchos dolares , pero tengo pocos. (substantivo)  I thought I had many dollars, but I only have a few. 
 Pensaba que había muchas reglas confusas, pero en realidad hay unas pocas. (no substantivo)  I thought that I there was many confusing rules, but actually there are only a few. 

__________________
"There´s always money in the banana stand michael!"
--george bluthe sir

Last edited by bobjenkins; March 17, 2010 at 09:57 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old March 17, 2010, 09:58 PM
chileno's Avatar
chileno chileno is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Posts: 7,863
Native Language: Castellano
chileno is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by NiCACHiCA View Post
You guys are awesome!!! And I'm sure everyone around the forum thanks you often, but really, thank you so much for taking the time to help the beginners like me!! Some days I wonder if I'll ever get where I want to be with Spanish. But I know it's a life-long process! THANKS AGAIN!



On the second example, does "sorry" mean he was embarrassed that he couldn't help you and that's why he left? Or that maybe he was in a hurry or had an appointment and was sorry he couldn't stay to help? And would there be a difference in words used between the two scenarios?

And I don't mean to start a whole other discussion, but those questions bring up something that I encountered last night talking to a Nicaraguan friend. Her husband is sick with the flu and I told her to tell him "lo siento" because in the US when someone is sick, we always say I'm sorry (not even sure why we say that! haha). Well, she laughed at me and started to explain that lo siento is not used for that, but she never really explained it. I woke up this morning thinking about it and decided I'd ask my friends here if they could shed some light on the issue!
In the case of your sick friend. We do not say "I am sorry" but I hope she/he gets well son, and that's it.

We say "lo siento" if the person has had an accident or some other major thing including death.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old March 18, 2010, 02:15 AM
ROBINDESBOIS's Avatar
ROBINDESBOIS ROBINDESBOIS is online now
Diamond
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,912
ROBINDESBOIS is on a distinguished road
In Spain
Tener pena = To feel sad
Dar pena = to be sorry for
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old March 18, 2010, 04:06 AM
Jane's Avatar
Jane Jane is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Spain
Posts: 727
Native Language: English
Jane will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by ROBINDESBOIS View Post
In Spain
Tener pena = To feel sad
Dar pena = to be sorry for
When you say ¡que pena! doesn´t that also mean, What a pity!

Another thing is that I´ve always being intruiged by the different uses of:
¡Que pena!
¡Que lastima!
¡Que verguenza!

and how other Latin American countries use them?
__________________
Life´s Beautiful !
It gets even better!!!
Jane.

Last edited by Jane; March 18, 2010 at 04:43 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old March 18, 2010, 04:30 AM
irmamar's Avatar
irmamar irmamar is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,071
Native Language: Español
irmamar is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane View Post
When you say ¡que pena! doesn´t that also mean, What a pity!

Another thing is that I´ve always being intruiged by the different uses of:
¡Que pena!
¡Que lastima!
¡Que verguenza!

How do other Latin American countries use them?
Sí, ¡qué pena! = what a pity! (creo )
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old March 18, 2010, 05:11 AM
poli's Avatar
poli poli is offline
rule 1: gravity
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In and around New York
Posts: 7,440
Native Language: English
poli will become famous soon enoughpoli will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Sí, ¡qué pena! = what a pity! (creo )
seguro
__________________
Me ayuda si corrige mis errores. Gracias.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old March 18, 2010, 07:29 AM
chileno's Avatar
chileno chileno is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Posts: 7,863
Native Language: Castellano
chileno is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane View Post
When you say ¡que pena! doesn´t that also mean, What a pity!

Another thing is that I´ve always being intruiged by the different uses of:
¡Que pena!
¡Que lastima!
¡Que verguenza!

and how other Latin American countries use them?
What a pity means both "Qué pena" y "Qué lástima"

"Qué vergüenza" = What a shame.

Problem is that some LA countries equate "Qué pena" with "Qué vergüenza"
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Question about a couple sentences. "la compro"..."te espero".. ItsThaMonsta Grammar 2 November 09, 2009 06:59 PM
Una oración de un partido de fútbol ("el fraseo" y "para que" bobjenkins Translations 2 September 30, 2009 01:01 PM
Quick question about the "-aron"/"-ieron" ending chanman Grammar 6 May 30, 2009 11:20 PM
Verbs like "lavar", "cepillar", y "despertar" laepelba Grammar 9 February 02, 2009 03:01 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:59 PM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X