Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Grammar


Verbs ending with 'st (feed'st)

 

This is the place for questions about conjugations, verb tenses, adverbs, adjectives, word order, syntax and other grammar questions for English or Spanish.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old September 17, 2010, 10:48 AM
ookami's Avatar
ookami ookami is offline
Sapphire
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Buenos Aires
Posts: 1,283
Native Language: Español(Argentina)
ookami is on a distinguished road
Verbs ending with 'st (feed'st)

I'm trying to read some Shakespeare sonnets and I need to know which is the function of 'st at the end of a verb.

Feed'st thy light'st flame with self-substantial fuel
alimentas la llama, de tu luz con tu esencia,


It's like "you feed"?

Thanks.
__________________
Please, don't hesitate to correct my English.
'Time is a sort of river of passing events, and strong is its current; no sooner is a thing brought to sight than it is swept by and another takes its place, and this too will be swept away.' M.A.
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old September 17, 2010, 10:52 AM
Perikles's Avatar
Perikles Perikles is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Tenerife
Posts: 4,814
Native Language: Inglés
Perikles is on a distinguished road
English verbs used to inflect more than just the present 3 sing.,

I know
Thou knowest
He knows

The 2nd sing. -est was thus one extra syllable, and if a poet wanted to cheat by not counting it as a syllable, he would put (Thou) know'st.

Does that help?

Last edited by Perikles; September 17, 2010 at 10:54 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old September 17, 2010, 11:17 AM
ookami's Avatar
ookami ookami is offline
Sapphire
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Buenos Aires
Posts: 1,283
Native Language: Español(Argentina)
ookami is on a distinguished road
Yes, that helps a lot
Thank you!
__________________
Please, don't hesitate to correct my English.
'Time is a sort of river of passing events, and strong is its current; no sooner is a thing brought to sight than it is swept by and another takes its place, and this too will be swept away.' M.A.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old September 17, 2010, 09:31 PM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,506
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Agree with Perikles about the apostrophe usage to eliminate a syllable.


The 2nd-person singular informal verbs ended in -(e)st.
The 2nd-person plural informal or the 2nd-person singular formal verbs were not inflected.

The 3rd-person singular verbs ended in -(e)th.
The 3rd-person plural verbs were not inflected.


Second Person

Nominative
singular informal
thou knowest - thou knowest not
knowest thou? - knowest thou not?
thou dost know - thou dost not know
dost thou know? - dost thou not know?

plural informal or singular formal
ye know - ye know not
know ye? - know ye not?
ye do know - ye do not know
do ye know? - do ye not know?

Objective
singular informal
thee

plural informal or singular formal
you

Genitive
singular informal
thy | thine (when following word began with a vowel sound)

plural informal or singular formal
your

Possessive
singular informal
thine

plural informal or singular formal
yours


Third Person

Nominative
singular
he knoweth - he knoweth not
knoweth he? - knoweth he not?
he doth know - he doth not know (the auxiliary verb 'do' is irregular)
doth he know? - doth he not know?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old September 18, 2010, 02:06 PM
lee ying's Avatar
lee ying lee ying is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: mexico city
Posts: 627
Native Language: spanish
lee ying is on a distinguished road
what language is this? ???
he knoweth - he knoweth not
knoweth he? - knoweth he not?
he doth know - he doth not know (the auxiliary verb 'do' is irregular)
doth he know? - doth he not know?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old September 18, 2010, 02:54 PM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,205
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
Es inglés antiguo, Lee Ying.
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old September 18, 2010, 02:54 PM
JPablo's Avatar
JPablo JPablo is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 5,557
Native Language: Spanish (Castilian, peninsular)
JPablo is on a distinguished road
This is the older English way... (I was going to say that it is "Old English" but "Old English" goes from c450–c1150.) (c means "circa" 'alrededor' 'aproximadamente' hacia el 450-1150)

Actually Modern English, is the English language since c1475, and so these forms were used by Shakespeare and many others... are considered part of this language.

But it is a similar archaic form like in Spanish, when in the 1600 they used "vos" and their verb forms... like,

¿No sabíais eso, señor Lee Ying?
En el español actual sería:
¿No sabías eso, Lee Ying?

Aunque reconozco que el inglés nos puede resultar más arcaico todavía a los que hablamos español...
__________________
Lo propio de la verdad es que se basta a sí misma, aquel que la posee no intenta convencer a nadie.
"An enemy is somebody who flatters you. A friend is somebody who criticizes the living daylights out of you."
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old September 18, 2010, 03:17 PM
hermit hermit is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: scotsburn, nova scotia
Posts: 617
Native Language: english
hermit is on a distinguished road
The language is English, old fashioned like Shakespeare, and is used all the time in the Bible.

Será inglés, de formas antiguas como usaba Shakespeare et al; también
leyendo La Biblia...
__________________
"Be brief, for no discourse can please when too long."
miguel de cervantes saavedra
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old September 18, 2010, 05:33 PM
Perikles's Avatar
Perikles Perikles is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Tenerife
Posts: 4,814
Native Language: Inglés
Perikles is on a distinguished road
It is hard to believe, but these verb forms still exist where I grew up in England, in Yorkshire.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old September 18, 2010, 06:02 PM
JPablo's Avatar
JPablo JPablo is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 5,557
Native Language: Spanish (Castilian, peninsular)
JPablo is on a distinguished road
I believe it... I do believe!
(I must be a believer... even if I don't quite believe everything the Book of books says... in its different and amazing many versions...)
__________________
Lo propio de la verdad es que se basta a sí misma, aquel que la posee no intenta convencer a nadie.
"An enemy is somebody who flatters you. A friend is somebody who criticizes the living daylights out of you."
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How come this ending is reversed? tmember Grammar 8 May 26, 2010 02:24 PM
Learn Spanish vocab and feed the hungry Sarah Teaching and Learning Techniques 0 March 25, 2010 05:31 PM
Verbs ending in "-guir" laepelba Grammar 34 February 07, 2010 03:32 AM
A Fox, Chicken, and Bird Feed Jessica General Chat 4 December 24, 2008 06:35 PM
-ous ending adjectives Alfonso Grammar 1 April 04, 2008 04:43 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:37 PM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X