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Loris enero

 

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  #1  
Old June 26, 2009, 01:45 PM
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Loris enero

This short poem is very confusing and I cannot translate it at all.
According to the language finder, it is:
SPANISH:
RELIABLE: - YES
CONFIDENCE - 58.73%
Sí señor, dia digó
Forti loris enero
De y no loris, de mar trux
Fulo guis a nensandúx
The translator could not do much better.
 
Yes sir, I say day
Loris Forti January
Rather Loris, sea Trux
Fulo GUIs to nensandúx
This is evidently not Castilian Spanish, but some obscure dialect.
Can anyone please help me to translate it into English or even Spanish???
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  #2  
Old June 26, 2009, 02:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brute View Post
This short poem is very confusing and I cannot translate it at all.
According to the language finder, it is:
SPANISH:
RELIABLE: - YES
CONFIDENCE - 58.73%
Sí señor, dia digó
Forti loris enero
De y no loris, de mar trux
Fulo guis a nensandúx
The translator could not do much better.
 
Yes sir, I say day
Loris Forti January
Rather Loris, sea Trux
Fulo GUIs to nensandúx
This is evidently not Castilian Spanish, but some obscure dialect.
Can anyone please help me to translate it into English or even Spanish???
This is not Spanish, not even an obscure Spanish dialect. There's somethink from Latin and English here, and this is not well written. Maybe this can help you (though I'd like to know where you extracted it from, I'd like to know anything else about this poem )

There they go, there they go
forty lorries in a row
They ain't lorries, they are trucks
Full of geese and hens and ducks
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  #3  
Old June 26, 2009, 03:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
This is not Spanish, not even an obscure Spanish dialect. There's somethink from Latin and English here, and this is not well written. Maybe this can help you (though I'd like to know where you extracted it from, I'd like to know anything else about this poem )

There they go, there they go
forty lorries in a row
They ain't lorries, they are trucks
Full of geese and hens and ducks
The original version was seen hanging on a kitchen wall. I had to alter the spelling somewhat to fool the language recognition software. The original spelling scored very badly with SPANISH, RELIABLE No, CONFIDENCE 0.01%. The machine translater (poor thing) tried very hard to make some sense of it. You should try it out. Its great fun!
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  #4  
Old June 26, 2009, 03:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
This is not Spanish, not even an obscure Spanish dialect. There's somethink from Latin and English here, and this is not well written. Maybe this can help you (though I'd like to know where you extracted it from, I'd like to know anything else about this poem )

There they go, there they go
forty lorries in a row
They ain't lorries, they are trucks
Full of geese and hens and ducks
¡El poema es raro! Me pregunta, ¿quién lo escribió?

En inglés británico se usa, ''lorry'' y en los estados unidos se dice, ''truck''

Here is a badly parked lorry/truck


etymology
Quote:
TRUCK
The word "truck" possibly derives from the Greek "trochos" (τροχός = wheel). In North America, certain kinds of big wheels were called trucks. When the gasoline-engine driven trucks came into fashion, these were called "motor trucks."
Quote:
LORRY
"A truck, a long, flat wagon," 1838, British railroad word, probably from verb lurry "to pull, tug," of uncertain origin. Meaning "large motor vehicle for carrying goods" is first attested 1911.
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  #5  
Old June 26, 2009, 03:14 PM
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I think that it's something to learn Spanish, but it must be read with English accent. Maybe the original spelling can help. I think it starts with something which sounded like "Sevilla". I'm almost sure it's used in UK, but I'm not sure at all.
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  #6  
Old June 26, 2009, 03:25 PM
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It sounds like a poem that might help with Spanish pronunciation.
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  #7  
Old June 26, 2009, 03:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobjenkins View Post
¡El poema es raro! Me pregunta, ¿quién lo escribió?

En inglés británico se usa, ''lorry'' y en los estados unidos se dice, ''truck''

Here is a badly parked lorry/truck


etymology
Nice the picture. The you don't know is that the truck wanted to Jeepear inside of the water.


For that motive the truck is badly parked.
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  #8  
Old June 26, 2009, 03:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobjenkins View Post
¡El poema es raro! Me pregunta, ¿quién lo escribió?

En inglés británico se usa, ''lorry'' y en los estados unidos se dice, ''truck''

Here is a badly parked lorry/truck


etymology
Written by the Roman poet Anonymus I suspect. One down, only39 left. Have the guis a nensandúx managed to escape yet?
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  #9  
Old June 27, 2009, 01:32 AM
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I think it's a joke, a Latin poem bad written which when you read it aloud and fast, it sounds like the poetry I wrote in English (more or less)
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  #10  
Old June 27, 2009, 04:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
I think it's a joke, a Latin poem bad written which when you read it aloud and fast, it sounds like the poetry I wrote in English (more or less)
Do I ever say serious things? Yes it is a joke. In Yorkshire, as in Spain and France, H is a silent letter. That is why we can talk about 'ens. If you want an H sound I suppose J is the nearest.
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