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"Missed Hitting" (an Object)/Barely Missed (an Object)

 

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Old January 23, 2019, 10:00 PM
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"Missed Hitting" (an Object)/Barely Missed (an Object)

How do you say "Missed hitting" (an object) as in almost hitting something, but it didn't actually hit it. It missed hitting the object. It barely missed the object:

erró golpear?? erró golpeando?? erró al golpear?? falló golpear?? falló golpeando?? falló al golpear??

The awning fell apart in the wind, and the iron rod barely missed hitting the van/barely missed the van parked at the edge of the sidewalk.

El toldo se desbarató en el viento, y la vara de hierro apenas erró golpear?? la camioneta estacionado junto al borde de la acera.

The stone just missed hitting me/barely missed me.

La piedra acaba de errar golpearme??

As always, all input, suggestions, and explanations as to how to say the above sentences is appreciated.
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  #2  
Old January 23, 2019, 11:11 PM
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There are a couple of ways you can say this, and I'm certain others can chime in, but I use "por poco ..." to say that something just/barely missed me or another object. The present tense is usually used, but the English translation is in the past tense.

Por poco me choca el coche/auto/carro.
The car almost hit/barely missed me.
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Old January 24, 2019, 11:27 AM
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Thanks, Rusty. I'm familiar with por poco and how it's used, so that's a good option that I'll be able to remember.
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Old January 24, 2019, 11:45 AM
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An obvious one is casi me choca el coche.
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Old January 24, 2019, 05:02 PM
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I agree with Rusty and Poli.
For the Mexican touch, you may say "(me) pasó rozando", or "por poquito y el fierro (me) da en el carro / le da al carro".
...or: "me salvé por un pelito (de rana calva)".
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Old January 24, 2019, 06:41 PM
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Thank you, Poli and Angelica.

Referring to the first sentence about the rod barely missing the van, and using “pasarse rozando,” is it “la vara/la barra le pasó rozando a la camioneta”? Am I conjugating it correctly?

Also, are “errar” and/or “fallar” not viable verbs to convey barely missing an object?

I understand how the Mexican touches, "casi," and "por poco" work when it deals with barely missing me, but I’m still unclear about something barely missing an object. I'm still unclear about saying the first sentence correctly.
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Old January 25, 2019, 04:10 AM
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La marquesina se soltó con el viento y (un/a) (fierro/barra de hierro) (-casi- pasó rozando / -casi- pasó raspando / casi le da / casi le pega / por poco le pega / por poco y le pega) a la camioneta que estaba estacionada junto al (cordón/bordillo)

La van por poco se salvó de que una barra de hierro le pegara.
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Old January 25, 2019, 10:45 AM
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Thank you, AleCcowaN. I understand it now.
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Old January 25, 2019, 04:19 PM
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Old January 25, 2019, 06:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobbert View Post
is it “la vara/la barra le pasó rozando a la camioneta”? Am I conjugating it correctly?
Yes, that's right. I'd also say "la varilla" (a metal rod used for construction) or "fierro" (almost any piece of metal) instead of "vara" (which I'd only use for a branch of a tree) or "barra", which is not incorrect, but not my first choice.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobbert View Post
Also, are “errar” and/or “fallar” not viable verbs to convey barely missing an object?
I think "errar" and "fallar" need an intention to hit, which an object by itself cannot have.
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