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Different Countries' names for their public lavatories

 

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  #11  
Old February 24, 2011, 02:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
meets the hoi polloi
Yes, but it's meets hoi polloi because hoi is the definite article (It should actually be tous pollous, but that is a different story).
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  #12  
Old February 24, 2011, 08:04 AM
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The definition in my Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary uses "the", but thank you for the correction. Both expressions are new for me.
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  #13  
Old February 24, 2011, 05:50 PM
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In the States I've also heard "outhouse". This is a structure in the country without plumbing. I used one as a kid. For goodness sake, never drop a toy into one. If you get it out, if you clean it thoroughly, the toy will never again have the appeal to you it once had.

Also retrete, WC (water closet), inodoro, sanitario, excusado, etc. In Costa Rica, when someone tells you he is sorry, you tell him "Estás excusado". It's just a little "potty humor".
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  #14  
Old March 02, 2011, 10:19 AM
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Actually the most generally accepted origin of the rather twee British name 'loo' comes from the emptiying of chamber pots from fist floor of medieval houses and alerting passers by with a cry of "Guarde l'eau"!

The theory is that that the upper classes employ 'lavatory' to distinguish themselves from lesser mortals who say 'toilet'! Accordig to QI it was the pisshouse until Queen Victoria's ultra delicate sensibilities became de rigueur!
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Old March 09, 2011, 10:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas View Post
In the States I've also heard "outhouse". This is a structure in the country without plumbing. I used one as a kid. For goodness sake, never drop a toy into one. If you get it out, if you clean it thoroughly, the toy will never again have the appeal to you it once had.
Now they're called Honey Buckets.
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  #16  
Old March 10, 2011, 02:04 AM
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I've only lived in England and Australia, so can only really comment on those, but in my experience, both countries use the same terminology, mostly.

In England you'll often just outright hear "Can you tell me where the toilets are please?", otherwise often, yes, loo. Less common, but still relatively frequent is lavvy (short for lavatory... which is seldom heard).

Bog is a very slang way of talking about the toilet in the UK :P

In Australia, same thing, you'll just hear "toilet" most often, and occasionally loo. I've never heard lavvy/lavatory being used here.

Australia have some other slang terms too, but you'd only use them between friends: dunny, shitter

Restroom is not used at all in these two countries!
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  #17  
Old March 12, 2011, 04:57 AM
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Restroom is not used at all in these two countries!

And I, for one am delighted to hear that, I detest those mealy-mouthed US euphimisms, panties is another one - what's wrong with knickers for God's sake?

Mind you, on the other hand I'm pleased to say that you never, ever hear that dreadful US insult 'M***er F***er' over here. I would say that if you hurled that at anyone this side of the Atlantic, you'd be in danger of dreadful retribution, for which the courts would offer little penalty.
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  #18  
Old March 12, 2011, 09:30 AM
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Hello.

Good morning.

When I read this post, I had a question. What does restroom means?
Because casually I did a little search in internet about its meaning, but I didn't have much luck or at least I didn't was lucky for the moment.


Bathroom and bestroon are they the same?

Where is used that phrase or definition.

That word is completely used for us in English for exchange the bathroom word?
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  #19  
Old March 12, 2011, 09:55 AM
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Este thread entero es sobre todos los modos decir "bathroom", sí

restroom = bathroom (pero sólo en EEUU).

Sin embargo no se usa la palabra a casa, se usa sólo a restaurantes/tiendas/bars/hotels etc.
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Last edited by conejodescarado; March 12, 2011 at 09:57 AM.
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  #20  
Old March 13, 2011, 05:28 AM
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Sin embargo no se usa la palabra en casa, se usa sólo en restaurantes/tiendas/bares/hoteles etc.[/QUOTE]

"Si hago errores (o digo cosas extrañas), déjame saberlo de modo que puedo entender y aprender, gracias "

Conejodescarado - I'm sorry to be rude, I really am, but I find "O digo cosas extraños" so funny. I think "O digo cosas incorrectas" or "Algo incorrecto" would be far better. I mean 'cosas extrañas' isn't incorrect but it does sound funny - a bit like saying "If I say strange things".

Last edited by AngelicaDeAlquezar; March 13, 2011 at 02:06 PM. Reason: Merged back-to-back posts
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