Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Practice & Homework


El sol esta brillando

 

Practice Spanish or English here. All replies to a thread should be in the same language as the first post.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old May 22, 2010, 06:05 AM
Taxista Escoces's Avatar
Taxista Escoces Taxista Escoces is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Glasgow
Posts: 17
Native Language: English
Taxista Escoces is on a distinguished road
El sol esta brillando

Hoy el clima es muy agreable en Glasgow y voy a llevar mi hijos al parque local.
Entonces tengo que comer algo antes de ir a trabajar en el taxi.
Que va a hacer?
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old May 22, 2010, 06:25 AM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,911
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taxista Escoces View Post
Hoy el clima es muy agradable en Glasgow y voy a llevar a mi hijos al parque local.
Después, tengo que comer algo antes de ir a trabajar en el taxi.
¿Qué voy a hacer?
Corrections above. I'm not certain about the last question. What did you mean?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old May 22, 2010, 07:31 AM
JPablo's Avatar
JPablo JPablo is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 5,579
Native Language: Spanish (Castilian, peninsular)
JPablo is on a distinguished road
¡Hola Taxista Escocés! ¡Hola Rusty!
Al menos en España, (aunque quizá también en otros países donde se habla español) no diríamos "hoy el clima..." Porque "clima" parece abarcar un tiempo más prolongado que un solo día. En mi 'pueblo' diríamos: Hoy hace muy buen tiempo en Glasgow y llevaré a los niños al parque. O bien: Hoy hace un día muy agradable/bonito en Glasgow y voy a llevar a los niños [a mis hijos] al parque. Lo de añadir "local" creo que no haría falta en español, pues lo daríamos como sobreentendido. Decir "niños" or "mis niños" en España se entiende como "mis hijos".
Aunque una traducción o versión un poco más libre (although I hope, not 'unduly free') en España diríamos:
Luego iré a comer algo antes de ir a trabajar con el taxi.
(Trabajamos EN el taxi, cierto, pero creo que usamos más "trabajar con el taxi" o "trabajar conduciendo un taxi" o "trabajar de taxista". Doy esto como variantes posibles.
¿Qué vas a hacer tú? (If you meant to ask, "What are you going to do?")
While in Spanish we naturally omit the personal pronouns with the verbs, as we have the verb endings to indicate the person, in the case of a question, like this one, seems natural to include it.
Que... ¿Qué voy a hacer yo?
Como estoy en el turno de noche, iré a hacer algo de ejercicio al sol antes de darme una ducha e irme a dormir...
(If you make the question polite, you can also say, ¿Qué va a hacer usted? or 'Y usted, ¿qué va a hacer?')
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old May 22, 2010, 07:50 AM
chileno's Avatar
chileno chileno is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Posts: 7,863
Native Language: Castellano
chileno is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taxista Escoces View Post
Hoy el clima es muy agreable en Glasgow y voy a llevar mi hijos al parque local.
Entonces tengo que comer algo antes de ir a trabajar en el taxi.
Que voy a hacer?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
Corrections above. I'm not certain about the last question. What did you mean?
What am I going to do?/What other options do I have?/I have no other option(s).

Right?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old May 22, 2010, 11:37 PM
Taxista Escoces's Avatar
Taxista Escoces Taxista Escoces is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Glasgow
Posts: 17
Native Language: English
Taxista Escoces is on a distinguished road
Thank you all very much for your input.

I did, in fact, want to ask "What are you going to do?"
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old May 23, 2010, 01:50 AM
JPablo's Avatar
JPablo JPablo is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 5,579
Native Language: Spanish (Castilian, peninsular)
JPablo is on a distinguished road
You are welcome!
Just a couple of additional notes:
El sol está brillando.
Or you could say, El sol brilla. (I think more 'common' in Spain.) But also, there was a song in the 70s or 80s for an ice cream ad which was, "Está brillando el sol, no siento su calor..." (The sun is shinning, I do not feel its heat... because I am eating this ice-cream... and so on an so forth) (Having "el sol" at the end of the phrase is not common, it's just fine in the song in order to have some kind of rhyme with "heat" calor.)
Reply With Quote
Reply

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hay sol ... o hace sol? laepelba Grammar 27 September 28, 2012 07:46 PM
Las lágrimas del sol Flowers Practice & Homework 3 May 24, 2010 01:56 PM
Hay sol or Hace sol? cmon Grammar 3 March 30, 2010 11:32 AM
Sol DailyWord Daily Spanish Word 1 September 10, 2008 11:50 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:06 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X