Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Vocabulary > Idioms & Sayings


Salir al paso

 

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not readily apparent based on the individual words in the expression. This forum is dedicated to discussing idioms and other sayings.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old April 01, 2009, 07:56 AM
poli's Avatar
poli poli is offline
rule 1: gravity
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In and around New York
Posts: 7,346
Native Language: English
poli will become famous soon enoughpoli will become famous soon enough
Salir al paso

Does this mean to worm one's way out of?
Example:Ha salido al paso de las polémica.
__________________
Me ayuda si corrige mis errores. Gracias.
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old April 01, 2009, 08:08 AM
chileno's Avatar
chileno chileno is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Posts: 7,863
Native Language: Castellano
chileno is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
Does this mean to worm one's way out of?
Example:Ha salido al paso de las polémica.
No. It means, to obstruct the way, to oppose..

Salir del paso is what you want to use.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old April 01, 2009, 09:20 AM
laepelba's Avatar
laepelba laepelba is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Suburbs of Washington, DC (Northern Virginia)
Posts: 4,683
Native Language: American English (Northeastern US)
laepelba is on a distinguished road
Maybe I'm asking about something beyond my ability to understand at this point.... But, out of curiosity ... I understand that "salir del paso" means to obstruct ... and I understand that "polemica" means politics ... and it looks to me like the sentence is in the third person indicative perfect tense. Ugh! So in English, would the example be "It has obstructed the politics" or would it be "the politics have been obstructed"??
__________________
- Lou Ann, de Washington, DC, USA
Específicamente quiero recibir ayuda con el español de latinoamerica. ¡Muchísimas gracias!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old April 01, 2009, 09:26 AM
poli's Avatar
poli poli is offline
rule 1: gravity
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In and around New York
Posts: 7,346
Native Language: English
poli will become famous soon enoughpoli will become famous soon enough
I think it means weaseled his way out of a dispute. Polémico
means polemic (at opposite poles) not politics. Saliendo del paso,
however, is something a good politician does well.
__________________
Me ayuda si corrige mis errores. Gracias.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old April 01, 2009, 09:32 AM
laepelba's Avatar
laepelba laepelba is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Suburbs of Washington, DC (Northern Virginia)
Posts: 4,683
Native Language: American English (Northeastern US)
laepelba is on a distinguished road
Okay - so I had to look up "polemic" in an English dictionary. (Sigh...) It would help my Spanish if I were actually good at speaking English. Anyway - I was getting asking if it was a passive sentence construction. You're saying it's not ... but that someone/something weasled its/his way out of this dispute. So if one of my students wanted to argue with me about a grading policy, I could "salgo del paso de las polémicas" to avoid the conversation that I know will be adversarial.... ??
__________________
- Lou Ann, de Washington, DC, USA
Específicamente quiero recibir ayuda con el español de latinoamerica. ¡Muchísimas gracias!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old April 01, 2009, 09:45 AM
poli's Avatar
poli poli is offline
rule 1: gravity
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In and around New York
Posts: 7,346
Native Language: English
poli will become famous soon enoughpoli will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Okay - so I had to look up "polemic" in an English dictionary. (Sigh...) It would help my Spanish if I were actually good at speaking English. Anyway - I was getting asking if it was a passive sentence construction. You're saying it's not ... but that someone/something weasled its/his way out of this dispute. So if one of my students wanted to argue with me about a grading policy, I could "salgo del paso de las polémicas" to avoid the conversation that I know will be adversarial.... ??
You might say hypothetically: Yes the grading system is flawed, but currently as a teacher I am required to follow. In the future maybe we could work together to make the system more reflective of each individual students accomplishments. For now, howvever, we have to follow these guidelines. This would be weaseling your way out of a dispute or
saliendo al paso de la polémica.
__________________
Me ayuda si corrige mis errores. Gracias.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old April 01, 2009, 09:58 AM
laepelba's Avatar
laepelba laepelba is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Suburbs of Washington, DC (Northern Virginia)
Posts: 4,683
Native Language: American English (Northeastern US)
laepelba is on a distinguished road
Okay - then I actually do understand. Amazing!
__________________
- Lou Ann, de Washington, DC, USA
Específicamente quiero recibir ayuda con el español de latinoamerica. ¡Muchísimas gracias!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old April 01, 2009, 10:13 AM
chileno's Avatar
chileno chileno is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Posts: 7,863
Native Language: Castellano
chileno is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Maybe I'm asking about something beyond my ability to understand at this point.... But, out of curiosity ... I understand that "salir del paso" means to obstruct ... and I understand that "polemica" means politics ... and it looks to me like the sentence is in the third person indicative perfect tense. Ugh! So in English, would the example be "It has obstructed the politics" or would it be "the politics have been obstructed"??
Actually Salir al paso would mean to obstruct the way, to come out (someone or a problem) and get in someone's way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
I think it means weaseled his way out of a dispute. Polémico
means polemic (at opposite poles) not politics. Saliendo del paso,
however, is something a good politician does well.
Exactly, means to get out of a "problem", and usually it means you got out in good standing. And yes, politicians and diplomats do that extremely well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Okay - so I had to look up "polemic" in an English dictionary. (Sigh...) It would help my Spanish if I were actually good at speaking English.
When people, like you, start getting another language, usually the native language also improves.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old April 01, 2009, 10:45 AM
poli's Avatar
poli poli is offline
rule 1: gravity
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In and around New York
Posts: 7,346
Native Language: English
poli will become famous soon enoughpoli will become famous soon enough
Learning Spanish has definitely improved my English vocabulary.

So,salir al paso de means to obstruct
and salir del paso de means to metaphorically swerve. I'll have to remember that.
__________________
Me ayuda si corrige mis errores. Gracias.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old April 01, 2009, 11:31 AM
chileno's Avatar
chileno chileno is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, USA
Posts: 7,863
Native Language: Castellano
chileno is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
Learning Spanish has definitely improved my English vocabulary.
Same thing with my Spanisgh.

Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
So,salir al paso de means to obstruct
and salir del paso de means to metaphorically swerve. I'll have to remember that.
Exactly!

Although I would've never used swerve... it seems to fill the purpose as an akin to salir del paso.

Also, salir del paso, means to leave the way free. How about that?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Los que no son de paso poli Idioms & Sayings 2 September 10, 2008 08:42 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:35 PM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X