Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Grammar


la diferencia entre los verbos venir e ir

 

This is the place for questions about conjugations, verb tenses, adverbs, adjectives, word order, syntax and other grammar questions for English or Spanish.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old March 24, 2008, 10:30 AM
Iris's Avatar
Iris Iris is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Where the stork dropped me years ago, wish it had done it further north
Posts: 687
Native Language: nominally:Spanish, emotionally:Engl
Iris is on a distinguished road
Red face

Sorry, but I don't understand the part about ¿qué trae el sandwich? meaning you are fed up with always eating the same thing. That meaning is totally lost on me.Sorry
__________________
Take care,
María José
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #22  
Old March 24, 2008, 10:42 AM
Alfonso Alfonso is offline
Filósofo y Poeta
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,239
Alfonso will become famous soon enough
LOL. Maybe you're right. I'm just trying to explain that, as it's not very common to say ¿qué trae el sandwich? and, in this case, you are using the language in a forced way, a derogatory nuance is easily conveyed, meaning, for example, what you could imagine (I gave you two examples, but it doesn't matter which one you choose apart from them). But I also said, upper or lower, that the same phrase said with a sincere and frank smile will not have an ironic or sarcastic meaning.
So, I think a proper way will be ¿Qué lleva el sandwich? But you cannot say that ¿Qué trae el sandwich? is incorrect.
__________________
I welcome all corrections to my English.
Salu2 desde Madrid,
Alfonso

Last edited by Alfonso; March 24, 2008 at 05:36 PM. Reason: greenish corrections thanks to Iris
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old March 24, 2008, 10:53 AM
Iris's Avatar
Iris Iris is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Where the stork dropped me years ago, wish it had done it further north
Posts: 687
Native Language: nominally:Spanish, emotionally:Engl
Iris is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfonso View Post
LOL. Maybe you're right. I'm just trying to explain that, as it's not very common to say ¿qué trae el sandwich? and, in this case, you are using the language in a forced way, a derogatory nuance is easily conveyed, meaning, for example, what you could imagine (I gave you two examples, but it doesn't matter which one you choose ). But I also said, upper or lower, that the same phrase said with a sincere and frank smile will not have an ironic or sarcastic meaning.
So, I think a proper way will be ¿Qué lleva el sandwich? But you cannot say that ¿Qué trae el sandwich? is incorrect.
Sorry, I had not understood the "upper, lower" thingy. Well, I'm still not sure I understand it now.
I really enjoy using the green on you...
__________________
Take care,
María José
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old March 24, 2008, 10:59 AM
Alfonso Alfonso is offline
Filósofo y Poeta
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,239
Alfonso will become famous soon enough
Thanks a lot for your greenish corrections. It's really hard to read them, but that's the way to get the punishment I deserve.
Take care.
__________________
I welcome all corrections to my English.
Salu2 desde Madrid,
Alfonso
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old March 25, 2008, 05:16 AM
Elaina's Avatar
Elaina Elaina is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Midwest
Posts: 2,565
Native Language: English
Elaina will become famous soon enough
Couldn't we use....

¿Que trae el sandwich?

To find out what else is included with the sandwich? Or what other ingredients are in the sandwich? For example,

Jose and Maria are at a restaurant deciding what to eat.

Maria: Este restaurante tiene muchos sandwiches en la carta. Mira tienen el Mona Lisa, el Shakespeare, el VanGogh, etc...

Jose: ¿El Mona Lisa, qué trae el sandwich?

I think it could work, wouldn't it?

Elaina
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old March 25, 2008, 05:25 AM
Alfonso Alfonso is offline
Filósofo y Poeta
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,239
Alfonso will become famous soon enough
Of course, Elaina, it works, as much ¿qué trae el sandwich? as ¿qué lleva el sandwich? or, even, ¿de qué es el sandwich? or ¿de qué está hecho el sandwich? (this one less common in a restaurant, but can be used in a kitchen or in giving a recipe).
All of them are correct. I think there may be slight differences in the speaker's intention. Anyway, all of them are interchangeable.
__________________
I welcome all corrections to my English.
Salu2 desde Madrid,
Alfonso

Last edited by Alfonso; March 25, 2008 at 06:23 AM. Reason: Corrections thanks to Poli
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old March 25, 2008, 05:52 AM
poli's Avatar
poli poli is offline
rule 1: gravity
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In and around New York
Posts: 7,423
Native Language: English
poli will become famous soon enoughpoli will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfonso View Post
Of course, Elaina, it works, as much ¿qué trae el sandwich? as ¿qué lleva el sandwich? or, even, ¿de qué es el sandwich? or ¿de qué está hecho el sandwich? (this one less common in a restaurant, but can be used in a kitchen or in giving a recipe).
All of them are correct. I think there may be slight differences in the speaker's intention . Anyway, all of them are interchangeable.
Alfonso,
Cambié usas frases. No tengas pena de preguntar si necisitas saber la razón que lo corrigé.
Poli

¿En España no se usa bocadillo en lugar de sandwich? ¿Sabe que bocadillo
tiene otro significado en Latinoamerica?
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old March 25, 2008, 06:07 AM
Elaina's Avatar
Elaina Elaina is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Midwest
Posts: 2,565
Native Language: English
Elaina will become famous soon enough
Well, I think the word sandwich, although understood by all no matter where you are, is a very western word.

I think emparedado would be more appropriate but might be construed as a "stuffy" word.

It also has something to do with ribbon or material, algo asi.

Bocadillo, from where I have studied is a snack. Does it also mean sandwich in Spain? ¡Que interesante!



Elaina
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old March 25, 2008, 06:15 AM
Alfonso Alfonso is offline
Filósofo y Poeta
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,239
Alfonso will become famous soon enough
Thanks a lot, Poli. I think I can understand pretty well your corrections.

Greenish? Have yours in pink:

Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
Alfonso,
Cambié unas frases. No tengas pena de preguntar si necesitas saber por qué las corregí.
Poli
¿En España no se usa bocadillo en lugar de sandwich? ¿Sabes que bocadillo tiene otro significado en Latinoamerica?
I highlighted pena in blue because for me it's a very funny use of the word. For me, the meaning of pena is pity. So, I don't feel any pity to ask you. But I know that, at least in Colombia, pena means shyness.

Any Spaniard would say: No te dé vergüenza preguntar.

In Spain we distinguish between bocadillo and sandwich depending on the kind of bread it's made of. If the bread is made into a tin (pan de molde, Bimbo is a brand), we call it sándwich (the accent is to distinguish it from the English word).

No, I don't know the meaning of bocadillo in Latinoamérica. Come on, pls, tell me!
__________________
I welcome all corrections to my English.
Salu2 desde Madrid,
Alfonso

Last edited by Alfonso; March 25, 2008 at 06:26 AM. Reason: meaning of words
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old March 25, 2008, 06:20 AM
Alfonso Alfonso is offline
Filósofo y Poeta
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,239
Alfonso will become famous soon enough
I'm sorry I couldn't read Elaina's post before posting mine.
Yes, I remember now that bocadillo, at least in Mexico, I think, is snack. We don't use it in Spain that way. Moreover, emparedado is not used here in Spain, but easily understood.
So, here we have three words with different meanings depending on the country where you are: bocadillo, sándwich, emparedado.
__________________
I welcome all corrections to my English.
Salu2 desde Madrid,
Alfonso
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

Tags
grammar, ir, venir, verbs

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
la posición de los adverbios gramatica Grammar 14 January 23, 2008 02:24 PM
Dia de los Inocentes Elaina Culture 4 December 30, 2007 03:28 PM
Conjugation of Venir Tia Gaby Grammar 14 August 30, 2007 07:05 PM
los imperativos gramatica Grammar 3 July 17, 2007 06:19 PM
la posicion de los adjectivos gramatica Grammar 1 July 08, 2007 05:51 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:10 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X