Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Grammar


Can the subject be placed in front of the verb

 

This is the place for questions about conjugations, verb tenses, adverbs, adjectives, word order, syntax and other grammar questions for English or Spanish.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old December 05, 2008, 03:42 PM
literacola's Avatar
literacola literacola is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: California, USA
Posts: 107
Native Language: American English
literacola is on a distinguished road
Can the subject be placed in front of the verb

Another question that is off'topic. When using the verb gustar, can the subject be placed in front of the verb instead of after it? I often see

Me gusta el café.

but can it be said as

El café me gusta.

Gracias

Last edited by Tomisimo; December 05, 2008 at 03:53 PM. Reason: Splitting post into two threads.
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old December 05, 2008, 10:17 PM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,623
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Absolutely. The subject can go in either place.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old December 05, 2008, 10:40 PM
Tomisimo's Avatar
Tomisimo Tomisimo is offline
Davidísimo
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: North America
Posts: 5,565
Native Language: American English
Tomisimo will become famous soon enoughTomisimo will become famous soon enough
As Rusty says, the subject can go on either side of the verb. In fact, Spanish is more flexible about this than English:

Juan is going to the store.
Juan va a la tienda.
Va a la tienda Juan.
Va Juan a la tienda.
__________________
If you find something wrong with my Spanish, please correct it!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old December 06, 2008, 01:51 AM
literacola's Avatar
literacola literacola is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: California, USA
Posts: 107
Native Language: American English
literacola is on a distinguished road
wow..I did not know that. So this is true of all verbs. Is there any difference in placement such as emphasis? How do native speakers place subjects in sentences and what are their reasons for choosing one over the other?

thanks guys
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old December 06, 2008, 04:42 AM
sosia's Avatar
sosia sosia is offline
Ankh-Morpork's citizen
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: a 55 cm del monitor
Posts: 2,984
Native Language: Spanish (Spain)
sosia has a spectacular aura aboutsosia has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by literacola View Post
wow..I did not know that. So this is true of all verbs. Is there any difference in placement such as emphasis? How do native speakers place subjects in sentences and what are their reasons for choosing one over the other?

thanks guys
When you discover it, tell me
Usually you put first or at the very end what do you want to remark
Me gusta mucho el café. YOU. We are talking about your preferences.
El café me gusta mucho. COFFEE. We are talking about coffee.
In both the meaning of the sentence is the same "I like coffee" or "coffee it's what I like"
In so a short sentence is not so easy to play. With long ones it's more easy.
But usually strange placement it's only used in lirycs.
Saludos
__________________
History, contrary to popular theories, "is" kings and dates and battles.
Small Gods Terry Pratchett
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old December 06, 2008, 07:41 AM
Jessica's Avatar
Jessica Jessica is offline
...
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 8,187
Native Language: English, Chinese
Jessica is on a distinguished road
my teacher said you can do that......
¿Cuánto tiempo hace que nada Felipe?
or
¿Cuánto tiempo hace que Felipe nada?

It can be either one, that's what Sra said.

Last edited by Jessica; December 06, 2008 at 08:46 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old December 06, 2008, 08:43 AM
CrOtALiTo's Avatar
CrOtALiTo CrOtALiTo is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Mérida, Yucatán
Posts: 11,680
Native Language: I can understand Spanish and English
CrOtALiTo is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by jchen View Post
my teacher said you can do that......
¿Cuánto tiempo hace que nadar Felipe?
or
¿Cuánto tiempo hace que Felipe nadar?

It can be either one, that's what Sra said.

Answer's Literacola are accurate.

Jchen, you made it up, because your examples are in a wrong.

You mean to say, Cuanto tiempo tiene or hace que felipe nada?

Cuanto tiempo tiene que felipe nada.


As you have wrote the last examples does make sence for me, and I believe that your teacher is a wrong.
__________________
We are building the most important dare for my life and my family feature now we are installing new services in telecoms.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old December 06, 2008, 08:46 AM
Jessica's Avatar
Jessica Jessica is offline
...
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 8,187
Native Language: English, Chinese
Jessica is on a distinguished road
She is not wrong
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old December 06, 2008, 08:59 AM
Tomisimo's Avatar
Tomisimo Tomisimo is offline
Davidísimo
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: North America
Posts: 5,565
Native Language: American English
Tomisimo will become famous soon enoughTomisimo will become famous soon enough
¿Cuánto tiempo hace que nada Felipe?
¿Cuánto tiempo hace que Felipe nada?
¿Hace cuánto tiempo que nada Felipe?
¿Hace cuánto tiempo que Felipe nada?
__________________
If you find something wrong with my Spanish, please correct it!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old December 06, 2008, 03:29 PM
literacola's Avatar
literacola literacola is offline
Pearl
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: California, USA
Posts: 107
Native Language: American English
literacola is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by sosia View Post
When you discover it, tell me
Usually you put first or at the very end what do you want to remark
Me gusta mucho el café. YOU. We are talking about your preferences.
El café me gusta mucho. COFFEE. We are talking about coffee.
In both the meaning of the sentence is the same "I like coffee" or "coffee it's what I like"
In so a short sentence is not so easy to play. With long ones it's more easy.
But usually strange placement it's only used in lirycs.
Saludos
Thank you sosia.

¿Te molesta la nieve?

No, la temperatura fría me molesta.

Are you bothered by the snow?

No, the cold temperature is what bothers me.

Am I correct in my assumption of the emphasis here?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

Tags
syntax, word order

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
In front or in back? bleitzow Grammar 5 January 26, 2008 01:43 AM
Lo - In front, or behind? bleitzow Grammar 2 October 29, 2007 04:10 PM
Reflexive verb help anitagringita Grammar 8 September 28, 2007 02:47 PM
verb infinitives pogo Grammar 5 June 17, 2007 08:55 PM
can anyone explain this verb for me ?? pogo Grammar 4 May 19, 2006 12:27 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:39 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X