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Christmas and New Year

NavidadNFP - Christmas


 Spanish  English 
 ¡Feliz Navidad!  Merry Christmas! 
 Navidad/DíaNM de Navidad  Christmas Day 
 navideño(a)ADJ  Christmas related 
 serieNF (de lucesNFP Christmas lights / string lights / string of lights 
 nacimientoNM/Belén[nm]  Nativity 
 árbolNM (de Navidad)/árbol de pascuaNF  Christmas tree 
 muñecoNM de nieveNF  snowman 
 esferaNF  (spherical) ornament 
 coronaNF  wreath 
 henoNM  hay 
 regaloNM  present 
 moñoNM  bow 
 botaNF  stocking 
 duendeNM  elf (Santa's little helpers) 
 Santa Clos / Papá Noel  Santa Claus 
 trineoNM  sledge / sled / sleigh 
 renoNM  reindeer 
 Rodolfo (el reno de la narizNF roja)  Rudolf (the red-nosed reindeer) 
 nochebuenaNF  poinsettia 
 NocheNF BuenaNF  Christmas Eve 
 piñataNF  piñata 
 muérdagoNM  mistletoe 
 brindisNM  toast 
 chimeneaNF  chimney 
 campanaNF  bell 
 cascabel NM  (jingle) bell /sleigh bell 
 velaNF  candle 
 bastónNM de carameloNM  candy cane 
 copoNM de nieveNF  snowflake 
 tarjetaNF de Navidad  Christmas card 
 juguetesNMP  toys 
 reyesNMP magosNMP (Melchor, Gaspar y Baltasar)  the (three) Wise Men (of/from the East) / the (Three) Kings (from the Orient) / the Magi (Caspar/Gaspar/Jaspar, Melchior, and Balthasar) 
 oroNM  gold 
 inciensoNM  frankincense 
 mirraNF  myrrh 
 escarchaNF (Mexico)  frost / tinsel / garland 
 espumillónNM (Spain)  garland 
 AñoNM NuevoNM  New Year 
 ¡Feliz Año Nuevo!  Happy New Year! 
 Año Viejo  Old Year 
 NocheNM Vieja  New Year's Eve 
 fuegosNMP artificiales  fireworks 
 propósitosNMP de año nuevo  New Year's resolutions 
 envolturaNF de regaloNM/papel[g]nm de regalo  gift wrap / wrapping paper 
 felicitaciónNF  greeting 
 villancicoNM  Christmas carol 
 panNM de frutasNFP/pan de pascua  fruitcake 
 galletaNF de jengibreNM  gingerbread 
 aguinaldoNM  Christmas bonus 


Last edited by AngelicaDeAlquezar; December 10, 2009 at 07:14 PM.
If you notice any errors or missing vocabulary, or you have a suggestion for this vocabulary topic page, please comment below.
   
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  #21  
Old December 01, 2009, 05:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ROBINDESBOIS View Post
Gingerbread girl
Sleighbells
Ornaments
Noisemakers
Carolers
Fireplace (the yule log)
Christmas crackers Christmas cookies
Santa´s snack
NAtivity scene Sometimes these Belens are known as creche
Bulbs Christmas lights or Holiday lights
Holly
Christmas bonus
Usually it's gingerbread man not girl but I suppose if there's on gender of gingerbread cookie there's another. Otherwise in theory they would never reproduce there wouldn't be any gingerbread cookies.

Eleana tiene razón fruitcake tiene una mala reputación y quisiera añadir que la merece. No obstante sirve bien como un quisio.

A propósito: Si una persona es nuttier than a fruitcake
significa que es desquisiado

A propósito: Una otra palabra Christmastime es Yuletide
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  #22  
Old December 01, 2009, 06:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjt33 View Post
There are various ways of forming noun phrases (NPs) in English. There's the simple noun (e.g. bell). There's adjective + NP (e.g. golden bell). There's NP + NP (e.g. sleigh bell).

The only context in which I know the phrase "jingle bell" is the song "Jingle bells", in which "jingle" is a verb used as an imperative. I'm not familiar with "jingle bell" as a noun phrase, and I'm trying to understand the construction. Is it just adopted from the song with a change from verb phrase (verb + subject) to noun phrase, or are you using jingle as an adjective or noun? (If you don't know then I may try asking a linguist).
Ahhh!! Thanks for explaining. It was the "NP" stuff that I didn't follow with. I'm not very good with grammar.

YES, I use "jingle bells" as a noun phrase. I don't know of any commonly used name for that type of bell, and since we usually only see them at Christmas time anyway, it's easy to refer to them as "jingle bells", and everyone knows exactly what I'm referring to.

I would probably guess that the sense is from the song. But I never thought of the word "jingle" as an imperative when it's used in the song. I suppose you may be right. But when I consider the song (and just discussed this with a colleague), the word "jingle" is simply modifying "bells". "Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way...." just says to me that I'm hearing the jingling of bells (that specific kind of bell) and that it happens the entire time that the sleigh is moving along.

Not sure if that answer is sufficient........

By the way - you can't even imagine the kind of conversation two MATH teachers could have about a point of English grammar......... LOL!!
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  #23  
Old December 01, 2009, 06:23 AM
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By the way, I really do NOT like fruitcake...........
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  #24  
Old December 01, 2009, 06:25 AM
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"envolturaNF de regaloNM" es también "papel de regalo", por lo menos aquí.

¿Como se dice "Christmas Day"? O ¿es que no hay traducción adecuada? No me sorprendería porque parece importar mucho menos en las culturas hispanohablantes que en las anglosajonas.
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  #25  
Old December 01, 2009, 06:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
By the way, I really do NOT like fruitcake...........
It's like pipe tobacco
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  #26  
Old December 01, 2009, 06:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
By the way - you can't even imagine the kind of conversation two MATH teachers could have about a point of English grammar......... LOL!!
A que sí. La mitad de mis amigos universitarios eran estudiantes de mates.
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  #27  
Old December 01, 2009, 07:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrOtALiTo View Post
Where you have gotten the ( Pan de pascua ). I mean in that store sells it, I have never heard about that bread in my life, I'd like give it a little bite.
Me too! :-)

Ours is not soft as panettone and it has walnuts in it. It goes stale so you cannot keep it for a long time.

*************

I thought garland = guirnalda
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  #28  
Old December 01, 2009, 10:30 AM
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@pjt33: Hmmm. I'm not a linguist, but for what's it's worth, here are my

The noun 'jingle bell' is a particular type of bell. It is also known as a 'sleigh bell', which happens to be a noun composed of two words, too. It's possible that the 'sleigh' in 'sleigh bell' could be an adjective, a verb, or a noun. No dictionary I checked gave an etymology. It would be my guess that the 'jingle' in 'jingle bell' could also be an adjective, a verb, or a noun. The Random House dictionary says the word was coined around 1885.

Jingle bells can be bought in any city of America. You can buy a single bell, or you can buy them in a group. Many people hang them on walls, doors, doorknobs, or on a horse's harness.
Bands and orchestras buy a group of jingle bells mounted on a wood block with a handle. The percussionist holds the handle with one hand, the jingle bells hanging downward, and bounces the block into the palm of his/her other hand to make the bells ring.

My take on the song "Jingle Bells" is not the same as yours. I hear "Jingle bells (noun), Jingle bells (noun), Jingle (present tense 3rd-person plural verb) all the way." "Oh, what fun it is to ride in a one-horse open sleigh!"
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  #29  
Old December 01, 2009, 10:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
No dictionary I checked gave an etymology. It would be my guess that the 'jingle' in 'jingle bell' could also be an adjective, a verb, or a noun.
.
.
My take on the song "Jingle Bells" is not the same as yours. I hear "Jingle bells (noun), Jingle bells (noun), Jingle (present tense 3rd-person plural verb) all the way." "Oh, what fun it is to ride in a one-horse open sleigh!"
Jingle is clearly onomatopoeic, and I would bet with pjt that jingle is an imperative in that annoying song. Having said that, Jingle bells (noun) is just as likely. In this particular case, I'm afraid I don't care much.

Edit: Wiki says

Music historian James Fuld notes that the "the word jingle in the title and opening phrase is apparently an imperative verb."[3] However, it is commonly taken to mean a certain kind of bell.

So there we are. It is possible that at the time of writing the song, Pierpont meant the verb. On the basis of the expression in the song, the noun 'jingle bell' was invented, or just misunderstood. This is my theory, which is either brilliant, or total crap.

Last edited by Perikles; December 01, 2009 at 10:58 AM.
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  #30  
Old December 01, 2009, 11:31 AM
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is lanturn (sp??) in there? Or wait, the New Year has nothing to do with Chinese New Year right...?
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