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Infinitive + que

 

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  #1  
Old July 25, 2018, 07:15 AM
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Infinitive + que

Hola, im looking for something which covers the use of "que" after an infinitive. Things like Dejar que, tengo que etc in which the use of que changes the meaning (or seems to change the meaning) of the infinitive.

Is there anything?
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  #2  
Old July 25, 2018, 10:57 AM
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I'm not sure what your question is, but tengo que means I have to, and just plain tengo means, I have. Dejar means to leave, and dejar de means to stop doing something.
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Old July 25, 2018, 01:37 PM
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What you meant was 'tener que' in your post. As far as I know, ONLY 'tener que' exists, using the pattern you described.
'Dejar que' doesn't exist in Spanish.
The verb 'dejar' can be translated into English various ways; 'leave' ('let alone') is one translation. As poli noted, it's 'dejar de' that you might have meant, since it takes on another meaning ('stop', 'give up', etc.), but there are several verbs that take on a different meaning depending on whether or not a preposition follows, and which preposition it is.
The prepositions allowed after a verb are listed here. As you progress through the lists, darás con expresiones y sentidos nuevos (you'll run into new expressions and meanings).
'Dejar de' is followed by a noun, by the way, not an infinitive. Prepositions can be followed by a noun or an infinitive, so two lists are provided per preposition.
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Old July 25, 2018, 02:52 PM
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@funkcanna: "Que" after a verb is necessary depending on the sentence more than on the verb itself. Do you have specific examples of what you want to know so we can be of more help?

Side note: Although in most cases there are alternative constructions (often more "elegant"), "dejar que" does exist in Spanish, in the sense of letting something happen:

- Cuando vi que era muy pesado para mí, dejé que el jarrón se cayera.
When I saw it was too heavy for me, I let the vase fall down.

- No voy a dejar que un jovencito me diga cómo hacer mi trabajo.
I won't let a youngster tell me how to do my job.

- Si devuelves el dinero, dejamos que te vayas.
If you give the money back, we will let you go.

- No me gustan esos padres que dejan que los niños siempre hagan lo que quieran.
I don't like those parents that let children always do as they please.

- No voy a dejar que te salgas con la tuya.
I won't let you get away with it.

- No quiero dejarte solo, pero no dejas que te ayude.
I don't want to leave you on your own, but you won't let me help you.
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Old July 26, 2018, 12:39 AM
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Thank you all for your replies, I have seen dejar que for sure though such as Dejar que venga tu hermano.

Appreciate all the information and the link to prepositions!
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