#21  
Old September 20, 2009, 12:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
Coffin: ataúd, caja/cajón de muerto, féretro, catafalco.
Gracias, Angelica
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  #22  
Old September 20, 2009, 04:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
@Empanada: "cofre" or "baúl" can be big wooden boxes... not only treasure containers.


Otro cofre:

El mecánico me pidió que abriera el cofre del auto para ver el motor.
The mechanic asked me to open the hood of the car to see the motor.
or bonnet of course in UK. Does it also work for the back end of a car?

trunk or boot
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  #23  
Old September 20, 2009, 07:38 PM
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@Brute: In Mexico, the trunk is "cajuela", but I know in some other countries it's called "maletero".
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Old September 20, 2009, 08:47 PM
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We use (like 99,99%) "baúl" to name the trunk.
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Old September 21, 2009, 12:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brute View Post
or bonnet of course in UK. Does it also work for the back end of a car?

trunk or boot

Ahhh... I never knew it was called a 'boot' also... now the name of the show called 'Car booty' makes so much more sense to me..

(I was thinking it was slang of sorts..)

I guess "booty call" is another boot/booty again all entirely..??

Wonder if the word 'bootlegging' is derived from this meaning of the word 'boot' too or does it have another origin - does anyone know?
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Old September 21, 2009, 08:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmpanadaRica View Post
Ahhh... I never knew it was called a 'boot' also... now the name of the show called 'Car booty' makes so much more sense to me..

(I was thinking it was slang of sorts..)

I think "car booty" comes from "car boot sale", a type of "jumble sale" or "Flea market" where people buy and sell things from the back of a car.

I guess "booty call" is another boot/booty again all entirely..??

Wonder if the word 'bootlegging' is derived from this meaning of the word 'boot' too or does it have another origin - does anyone know?
"Booty" describes the treasures stolen by a pirate, or I think it can also mean "Buttocks" or "Butt" in the USA. In Norfolk the natives allegedly say "booty" and "bootiful", as in adverts by Bernard Matthews (a Turkey farmer)
I think your "booty callers" might be after chasing your beautiful butt in order to plunder your treasures, rather than your kinky footware.

I have no idea how a bootlegger gets his name.

PS tried to send you a clip of "Kinky Boots film - these boots were made ...." without success, but you can google it very easily!
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Old September 21, 2009, 09:04 AM
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I believe that the word "boot" is also used for a tire lock (as pictured) when a car has been parked illegally. It is placed by the municipality, and is impossible for the owner to remove. It usually costs a LOT to "fix" the situation.
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Old September 21, 2009, 09:16 AM
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A German friend of mine was listening to the funeral of Winston Churchill on Dutch radio. Lady Churchill was walking behind the coffin, when the commentator said: "Lady Churchill lopt agter de kist" It sounded to him that "she was running after the crate/ packing case" He thought it sounded funny.
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Old September 21, 2009, 09:27 AM
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Well in fact I just escaped a rather persistent "looter" who was after my booty when I was taking some sunshine outside.. Guess he was looking for a booty call But he was "llamando a la puerta equivocada.."

Thanx for the explanations and elaborations Brute and Lou Ann

Quote:
Originally Posted by brute View Post
A German friend of mine was listening to the funeral of Winston Churchill on Dutch radio. Lady Churchill was walking behind the coffin, when the commentator said: "Lady Churchill lopt agter de kist" It sounded to him that "she was running after the crate/ packing case" He thought it sounded funny.
"Lady Churchill loopt achter de kist".

kist=chest or coffin. Well in the 'pirate chest of gold' sense not in the male 'pirate' after female assets sense.. schatkist = treasure chest.

In fact 'schat' means 'treasure' but it is also a term of endearment like my honey, darling, sweetie..

Crate = 'krat', packing case = 'doos' I guess although 'doos' is also a derogatory term for a 'mujer/muchacha tonta'.. so be careful not to call your girlfriend 'doos' instead of 'schat' if you ever end up with a Dutch liaison.. Might be a painful mistake..

To run after = ergens achteraan lopen/rennen.
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Last edited by EmpanadaRica; September 21, 2009 at 09:32 AM.
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  #30  
Old September 21, 2009, 12:32 PM
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To run after = ergens achteraan lopen/rennen. [/QUOTE]
Ag jammer! Agter is die Afrikaanse spelling!
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