Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Grammar


Pregunta sobre verbos

 

This is the place for questions about conjugations, verb tenses, adverbs, adjectives, word order, syntax and other grammar questions for English or Spanish.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old September 05, 2008, 07:48 AM
supa-coopa supa-coopa is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Virginia, USA
Posts: 26
Native Language: American English
supa-coopa is on a distinguished road
Pregunta sobre verbos

Tengo una pregunta sobre verbos cuándo una persona es el receptor de la acción.
I have a question about verbs when a person is the receiver of the action.

hacerme - hacer + me - "to give me" or "to do me"?
llevame - lleva + me - "to take me" or simply "take me"? or "carry me"? (why was the "r" dropped on this one?)
perderte - peder + te = "to lose you" or "losing you"?

¿Se puede añadir "me" a alguna verbo cuándo una persona recibe la acción?
Can you add "me" to any verb when a person (me) receives the action?

¿Se puedo añadir "te" a alguna verbo cuándo una persona recibe la acción?
Can you add "te" to any verb when a person (you) recieves the action?

I've hear these verbs used this way in song lyrics.

Si Tu No Vuelves
Y cada noche vendra una estrella
hacerme compañia....

La Tortura
Ay amor fue una tortura
Perderte....

La Despedida
Llevame, donde estés, llevame....




Please correct any and all errors in spanish that I have made. Gracias!!

Last edited by supa-coopa; September 05, 2008 at 07:49 AM. Reason: I misspelled something so I edited.
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old September 05, 2008, 08:00 AM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is online now
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,605
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by supa-coopa View Post
Tengo una pregunta sobre los verbos cuándo una persona es el receptor de la acción.
I have a question about verbs when a person is the receiver of the action.

hacerme - hacer + me - "to make me" or "to do me"?
llévame - lleva + me - "to take me" or simply "take me"? or "carry me"? (why was the "r" dropped on this one?) This is the imperative (command) form. Note the accent.
perderte - perder + te = "to lose you" or "losing you" ?

¿Se puede añadir "me" a cualquier verbo cuándo una persona recibe la acción? Yes, but only if the verb is in its infinitive or imperative form (with proper accent).
Can you add "me" to any verb when a person (me) receives the action?

¿Se puede añadir "te" a cualquier verbo cuándo una persona recibe la acción? Yes, it's also an indirect object pronoun. All IOPs can be tacked on the end, providing the conditions set above are met.
Can you add "te" to any verb when a person (you) recieves the action?

I've heard these verbs used this way in song lyrics.

Si Tu No Vuelves
Y cada noche vendrá una estrella
a hacerme compañia....

La Tortura
Ay amor fue una tortura
Perderte....

La Despedida
Llévame, donde estés, llévame....




Please correct any and all errors in Spanish that I have made. ¡¡Gracias!!
The indirect object pronoun (me, in your examples above) can be tacked onto the end of the infinitive (the verbs that end in -ar, -er, or -ir) and on the end of an imperative (command form). Otherwise, it precedes the verb.
Notice the accent marks I added to the imperatives.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old September 05, 2008, 08:25 AM
supa-coopa supa-coopa is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Virginia, USA
Posts: 26
Native Language: American English
supa-coopa is on a distinguished road
If the infinitive form "hacer" means "to make" then why must we add "a"? Can you explain this to give me a better understanding? Thanks!

Also, what is the difference in alguno and cualquier?

Last edited by supa-coopa; September 05, 2008 at 08:27 AM. Reason: I forgot to add the last question. I'm always forgetting something!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old September 05, 2008, 09:33 AM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is online now
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,605
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by supa-coopa View Post
If the infinitive form "hacer" means "to make" then why must we add "a"? Can you explain this to give me a better understanding? Thanks!

Also, what is the difference in alguno and cualquier?
The 'a' before an infinitive is a preposition. It can be interpreted as meaning 'to'. It serves as an introduction to the infinitive, but isn't required in every case. It looks blantantly redundant to us anglohablantes (English speakers) because we've been taught that an infinitive always starts with 'to' and we read this construction as 'to to make', but hispanoparlantes don't think that way. The infinitive in the instance you cited needs an introductory preposition. It cannot stand alone. Que, para and por are other introductory prepositions you'll find before infinitives. Sometimes there is no need for a preposition. For example:
Tenemos muchas cosas que hacer mañana. (We have a lot of things to do tomorrow.)
Esto sirve para enseñarles a los niños a leer más rápido. (This is used to teach the children to read more quickly.)
No lo dejes por hacer otra cosa. (Don't put it aside to do another thing.)

You originally chose alguna verbo. Adjectives must agree in gender with the noun, so alguna is incorrect. Alguno matches the gender, but when it precedes a noun the 'o' is dropped. The accented syllable remains, however, so it is written algún.
Alguno means some. When it appears in an interrogative, algún verbo can be translated as any verbs or any verb. Look at this example:
¿Tocas algún instrumento? Usually translated as, "Do you play any instruments?" this question is really asking "Do you play some kind of instrument?"

Cualquier means any. This is the form the adjective takes when it precedes a noun of either gender. I chose to use cualquier verbo because that is the meaning I believe you intended.

Last edited by Rusty; September 05, 2008 at 11:27 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old September 05, 2008, 10:17 AM
supa-coopa supa-coopa is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Virginia, USA
Posts: 26
Native Language: American English
supa-coopa is on a distinguished road
So can we say that -

alguno - some kind of
cualquier - any one/kind at all; any of them

Do you sell some kind of fruit?
¿Vende usted alguna de fruta?


Yes, we sell apples. You can have any which one you want.
Si, vendemos manzanas. Puede tener cualquiera cuál que desea.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old September 05, 2008, 11:24 AM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is online now
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,605
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by supa-coopa View Post
So can we say that -

algún masc.noun | alguna fem.noun | masc.noun alguno | fem.noun alguna = some (some kind of, if it helps you to remember that it means some when it could be translated into English as any)
cualquier noun | noun cualquiera - any one/kind at all; any of them

When used as adjectives, these mean some and any, respectively. They are not interchangeable.

Do you sell some kind of fruit?
¿Vende usted alguna de fruta? -or- ¿Vende fruta?
It isn't necessary to say 'some kind of' in English or Spanish.

Yes, we sell apples. You can have any which one you want.
Sí, vendemos manzanas. Puede tener cualquiera cuál que desea.
You're asking good questions. Corrections and explanations above.
In your last sentence, cualquiera is technically a noun (functions as a direct object of the verb 'have'), but it carries the intended meaning.

Last edited by Rusty; September 05, 2008 at 11:29 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old September 05, 2008, 12:44 PM
supa-coopa supa-coopa is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Virginia, USA
Posts: 26
Native Language: American English
supa-coopa is on a distinguished road
Wink

I wouldn't normally specify "some kind of" like I did in my sentence about the fruit. I just wanted to be sure the context of what I was asking was clear as to how it would translated in spanish. I was just trying to make sure I was getting a complete understanding of the differences in alguno and cualquiera through this thick skull of mine.

Last edited by supa-coopa; September 05, 2008 at 12:45 PM. Reason: misspellings...as usual. LOL
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
la diferencia entre los verbos venir e ir gramatica Grammar 63 September 12, 2010 06:36 PM
Una pregunta soyricogringo Practice & Homework 11 August 31, 2008 03:44 PM
Pregunta sobre acentuación gramática lblanco Grammar 18 August 25, 2008 06:44 AM
Poner los puntos sobre las íes. Alfonso Vocabulary 17 April 02, 2008 06:15 PM
Otra pregunta Inquirer Vocabulary 4 May 21, 2006 02:57 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:31 PM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X