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Old July 16, 2010, 05:49 AM
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Question Dry wall

Tomísimo nos da "albarrada".
En Oxford Superlex nos dan "muro de mampostería sin mortero".
La expresión del Oxford la entiendo, pero me parece un poco larga. Lo de "albarrada" me parece bien, pero no lo había oído nunca.

¿Alguien tiene otra idea para "dry wall"? (¿O es "albarrada" la mejor y única opción?)
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Old July 16, 2010, 06:53 AM
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I really think dry wall or sheet rock are North American products not much used elsewhere, but I may be wrong. I'm certain it's available at Home Depot in Mexico, but have you seen that product in Spain? I can't picture it there. For that reason I think the Spanish word for drywall most commonly used is drywall. As for the Spanish word for sheet rock: that will sound funnier to native English speakers.
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Old July 16, 2010, 07:22 AM
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Hey, Thank you Poli. You're right on what you say, and agree with you. But I checked Oxford Superlex and I got two good options,
Sheetrock® n (AmE) placa de yeso, pladur® m (Esp)

Thank you once more for your inspiration!

As far as "plancha/lámina de roca" goes... well, yes, I guess we would be entering into the Españanglés, variante autóctona del Spanglish.
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Old July 16, 2010, 07:35 AM
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Pladur! Bueno. Me alegro que te ayudé encontrar la contestación.
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Last edited by poli; July 16, 2010 at 10:09 AM.
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Old July 16, 2010, 07:52 AM
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Así es, pero como tú dices no creo que se use demasiado en la construcción por España... Aunque en una búsqueda de Google me da 478.000 hits, y el site de Pladur muestra que tienen distribudores en España, Portugal y Andorra, hablan (o escriben) de "placas de yeso laminadas", que aunque es más largo, se puede usar en algún contexto... (Y por lo visto están en marcha desde 1979... así que sí que deben estar usándolo...) En fin, gracias otra vez.
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Old July 16, 2010, 12:43 PM
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En México se llama tablaroca, pero la mayoría de las casas se construyen de block o tabique.
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Old July 16, 2010, 01:51 PM
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dry wall

In Britain a dry wall is as the dictionary definition: a wall constructed of stones without mortar. In Spain these are common, indeed, I saw a very smooth and regular wall being constructed to retain a roadside embankment in Cuenca province this year, I did't think to ask what the Spanish word was, but I would love to know.
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Old July 18, 2010, 01:01 AM
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I've heard.....drywall sheets....paredes/hojas/placas de emplaste

Sheetrock.....hojas/placas de cemento
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Old July 18, 2010, 07:36 AM
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Gracias, Elaina. ¿En México, EE. UU., o en algún otro sitio?
"Placas de emplaste" u ''hojas de cemento'' tiene sentido.

@jrheath. I do not know the exact name in Spanish, but "muro de piedra seco" is done without mortar.
Random house gives both definitions, (the original one I was looking for in Spanish is 1a and 1b.) (For 2, I believe "muro seco" or "muro de piedra seco" may do.)

dry wall, Building Trades.
1. Also, drywall.
a. an interior wall or partition finished in a dry material, usually in the form of prefabricated sheets or panels nailed to studs, as distinguished from one that is plastered.
b. a material, as wallboard or plasterboard, used for such a wall.

2. a masonry or stone wall laid up without mortar.
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Old July 18, 2010, 09:19 PM
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Dry wall is what you use to repair a wall or ceiling... ie "spackling". For example, if you were to have a hole in your wall, caused by whatever means, you would 'spackle' it or call a "spackler" to cut up a piece of dry wall and apply it to your broken wall.
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