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I have a problem with subjuntivo when I speak English

 

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  #1  
Old March 03, 2009, 03:48 AM
Bolboreta Bolboreta is offline
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I have a problem with subjuntivo when I speak English

In spanish we have subjuntivo, nor in english. And this is a problem to me to express many things because it Something that is suposed to be easier in english, is very, very difficult for me.

An example, in other post I wanted to say: A pesar de que esto sea correcto, trataré de decirlo de otra manera para enriquecer mi vocabulario.

I wrote it in present: In spite of this is correct ...But I still have the doubt of what verbal time may I use.

And my problem becomes bigger with imperfecto de subjuntivo, perfecto de subjuntivo and pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo. Any examples:

Si hubieras estado atento en clase, entenderías el ejercicio.
Que esté aquí ahora no quiere decir que haya vuelto para quedarme.
Si estuvieras en mi lugar lo entenderías.

I will be grateful whith any help to understand this.
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  #2  
Old March 03, 2009, 06:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolboreta View Post
In spanish we have subjuntivo, nor in english. And this is a problem to me to express many things because it Something that is suposed to be easier in english, is very, very difficult for me.

An example, in other post I wanted to say: A pesar de que esto sea correcto, trataré de decirlo de otra manera para enriquecer mi vocabulario.In English we would say: Even though this is correct, I will try to say it in another manner in order to enrich my vocabulary


I wrote it in present: In spite of this is correct ...But I still have the doubt of what verbal time may I use.

And my problem becomes bigger with imperfecto de subjuntivo, perfecto de subjuntivo and pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo. Any examples:

Si hubieras estado atento en clase, entenderías el ejercicio.
Que esté aquí ahora no quiere decir que haya vuelto para quedarme.
Si estuvieras en mi lugar lo entenderías.
This part is easy: Si hubieras estado atento en clase, entenderias el ejercicio=If I had paid (PLUPERFECT) attention in class, I would have understood the excercise ( rule is the conditional tensethe pluperect tense in English.)There is an alternate way of saying this in English and
is involves the English subjunctive: If I were more attentive in class, I would have understood the excercise. You should note that the use
of the English subjunctive is perfectly understood but it almost always is used by well educated people. A less educated person may may the error of saying:If I was more attentive in class, I would have understood the excercise.
I will be grateful whith any help to understand this.
------------------------------------------
Because the subjuntive is sparsely used in English, we have to use words
like may, even though, although, in spite of (words that express tentitiveness)
Si acaso no paresca claro mi explición, pide que la clarifique.(Did I get the
subjunctive right?
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  #3  
Old March 03, 2009, 07:32 AM
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If you want a few more options, just for comparison, here you go.

A pesar de que esto sea correcto...
Even though this is correct... (this is the best, most common way of saying it, as poli mentioned)
In spite of this being correct...
In spite of the fact that this is correct...

Si hubieras estado atento en clase, entenderías el ejercicio.

If you had paid attention in class, you would understand the exercise.
If you'd (you had) paid attention in class, you'd (you had) understand the exercise.
If you had been attentive in classe, you'd understand the exercise.

Que esté aquí ahora no quiere decir que haya vuelto para quedarme.
The fact that I'm here now doesn't mean I'm (I am) back to stay.
The fact that I'm here now doesn't mean I've (I have) come back to stay.
Even though I'm here now, that doesn't mean I'm here to stay. (this is the use of "even though" as Poli mentioned)

Si estuvieras en mi lugar lo entenderías.
If you were in my shoes you'd (you would) understand. (in this case, you use "were" which actually is subjunctive in English).
If you were in my position/place you would understand.
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  #4  
Old March 03, 2009, 07:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomisimo View Post
If you want a few more options, just for comparison, here you go.

A pesar de que esto sea correcto...
Even though this is correct... (this is the best, most common way of saying it, as poli mentioned)
In spite of this being correct...
In spite of the fact that this is correct...

Si hubieras estado atento en clase, entenderías el ejercicio.

If you had paid attention in class, you would understand the exercise.
If you'd (you had) paid attention in class, you'd (you had) understand the exercise.
If you had been attentive in classe, you'd understand the exercise.

Que esté aquí ahora no quiere decir que haya vuelto para quedarme.
The fact that I'm here now doesn't mean I'm (I am) back to stay.
The fact that I'm here now doesn't mean I've (I have) come back to stay.
Even though I'm here now, that doesn't mean I'm here to stay. (this is the use of "even though" as Poli mentioned)

Si estuvieras en mi lugar lo entenderías.
If you were in my shoes you'd (you would) understand. (in this case, you use "were" which actually is subjunctive in English).
If you were in my position/place you would understand.
An a couple of examples added for good measure...

Had I not paid attention in class, I would have never been able to accomplish this.

And................................

If I were a king you would be my queen.

Actually I used that phrase very early on....


What? I am latin! I'll have you know.
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  #5  
Old March 03, 2009, 11:27 AM
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CrOtALiTo CrOtALiTo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolboreta View Post
In spanish we have subjuntivo, nor in english. And this is a problem to me to express many things because it Something that is suposed to be easier in english, is very, very difficult for me.

An example, in other post I wanted to say: A pesar de que esto sea correcto, trataré de decirlo de otra manera para enriquecer mi vocabulario.

I wrote it in present: In spite of this is correct ...But I still have the doubt of what verbal time may I use.

And my problem becomes bigger with imperfecto de subjuntivo, perfecto de subjuntivo and pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo. Any examples:

Si hubieras estado atento en clase, entenderías el ejercicio.
Que esté aquí ahora no quiere decir que haya vuelto para quedarme.
Si estuvieras en mi lugar lo entenderías.

I will be grateful whith any help to understand this.

I understand clearly your examples. You have done a great job with your homework.
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  #6  
Old March 05, 2009, 02:29 AM
Bolboreta Bolboreta is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomisimo View Post
If you want a few more options, just for comparison, here you go.

A pesar de que esto sea correcto...
Even though this is correct... (this is the best, most common way of saying it, as poli mentioned) Ok, Understood.
In spite of this being correct...Why in this one you use gerund, and in the other two you use present tense?
In spite of the fact that this is correct...

Si hubieras estado atento en clase, entenderías el ejercicio.
HERE! here is where my doubts appear. Thanks for taking a few minutes to help me.

If you had paid attention in class, you would understand the exercise. So, If I want to say: Ella había prestado atención en clase, y por eso no tenía miedo al examen. What tense do I have to use? The same one? This is: She had paid attention in class, so she had no fear to the exam. Right?
If you'd (you had) paid attention in class, you'd (you had) understand the exercise.

If you had been attentive in classe, you'd understand the exercise.

Que esté aquí ahora no quiere decir que haya vuelto para quedarme.
The fact that I'm here now doesn't mean I'm (I am) back to stay.
The fact that I'm here now doesn't mean I've (I have) come back to stay.
Even though I'm here now, that doesn't mean I'm here to stay. (this is the use of "even though" as Poli mentioned)

Si estuvieras en mi lugar lo entenderías.
If you were in my shoes you'd (you would) understand. (in this case, you use "were" which actually is subjunctive in English).But it's indicative, too. Isn't it? I mean, if I want to say: Cuando estabas en mi lugar entendías esto de otro modo. If I am not wrong, It is: When you were in my shoes you understood this in other way.
If you were in my position/place you would understand.
So, if I'm right, and relating with what poli explained, in english subjunctive exists but is almost never used. Only well educated people knows and uses the subjunctive. Am I right?

Thanks to all for your commentaries,

B.
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  #7  
Old March 05, 2009, 04:12 AM
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In spite of this being correct...Why did you use a gerund in this one, and in the other two you used present tense?
'This being correct' is another way to say something tentative. 'Being correct' isn't a gerund, it is the present progressive. (gerundio <> gerund)

Si hubieras estado atento en clase, entenderías el ejercicio. HERE! Here is where my doubts appear. Thanks for taking a few minutes to help me.

If you had paid attention in class, you would understand the exercise. So, if I want to say, "Ella había prestado atención en clase, y por eso no tenía miedo al examen," what tense do I have to use? The same one? (Yes, the past perfect.) This is: She had paid attention in class, so she had no fear of the exam. Right? (Correct.)
If you'd (you had) paid attention in class, you'd (you had) understand the exercise.

Si estuvieras en mi lugar lo entenderías.
If you were in my shoes you'd (you would) understand. (in this case, you use "were" which actually is subjunctive in English). But it's indicative, too. Isn't it? (Yes, in this case 'were' is both the subjunctive and the indicative past tense. If the subject were in 1st or third person, you'd see that we still use 'were' (if we're educated enough to use the subjunctive, that is.)) I mean, if I want to say: Cuando estabas en mi lugar entendías esto de otro modo. If I am not wrong, It is: When you were in my shoes you understood this another way.

Hope I helped answer your questions.
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Old March 07, 2009, 10:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolboreta View Post
So, if I'm right, and relating with what poli explained, in english subjunctive exists but is almost never used. Only well educated people knows and uses the subjunctive. Am I right?

Thanks to all for your commentaries,

B.
First of all, 95% of all English speakers do not know what the word "subjunctive" means. But that doesn't mean they don't use the subjunctive. Linguistially, the subjunctive is disappearing from the language. It is definitely used in set phrases and quotes:

"If I were a butterfly" - were is subjunctive
"If I were you"

Older generations will tend to use "were" more then younger generations, who replace it with "was".

If I were happy, I wouldn't leave you.
If I was happy, I wouldn't leave you.

It really doesn't have much to do with education-- younger speakers will choose the second option, while older speakers are more likely to use the first.
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Old March 07, 2009, 12:57 PM
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Yes. David. You are right. I liked so much your explain about it.
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Old May 21, 2009, 07:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomisimo View Post
First of all, 95% of all English speakers do not know what the word "subjunctive" means. But that doesn't mean they don't use the subjunctive. Linguistially, the subjunctive is disappearing from the language. It is definitely used in set phrases and quotes:

"If I were a butterfly" - were is subjunctive
"If I were you"

Older generations will tend to use "were" more then younger generations, who replace it with "was".

If I were happy, I wouldn't leave you.
If I was happy, I wouldn't leave you.

It really doesn't have much to do with education-- younger speakers will choose the second option, while older speakers are more likely to use the first.
Another rare example of subjunctive in English found in a fairy tale:
"Be he alive or be he dead, I'll grind his bones to make my bread!"
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