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Is there a difference here?

 

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  #1  
Old March 25, 2011, 07:50 PM
ez123 ez123 is offline
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Is there a difference here?

Im not sure if there is any major grammatical difference to these two:

me estoy aburrido
estoy aburrido

with the "me" in front of the first, what does that do??? gracias!!!
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  #2  
Old March 25, 2011, 10:41 PM
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In this case they mean the same thing. The "me" makes the construction reflexive, but in this particular case the meaning doesn't change.

The verb aburrir means to bore, which is something you can do do somebody else:

¿Te estoy aburriendo? = Am I boring you?

While aburrirse (the reflexive form) means to get bored, which is an action entirely isolated to yourself.

Me estoy aburriendo = I'm getting bored.

Often when you make a verb reflexive (by making the recipient of the action the same as the subject), the meaning of the verb can be thought of as the English to get + verb.

For example to bore vs. to get bored, though this is just a guide if you can't find a real definition for the reflexive verb. Some verbs change meaning entirely when made reflexive, so you should always check a dictionary to be sure.

Because the construction you posted uses estoy + the past participle, it can only ever apply to yourself though, so the reflexive version is basically the same

Read up on reflexive verbs: http://spanish.about.com/od/sentence...xive_verbs.htm

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Old March 26, 2011, 01:12 AM
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irmamar irmamar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ez123 View Post
Im not sure if there is any major grammatical difference to these two:

me estoy aburrido
estoy aburrido

with the "me" in front of the first, what does that do??? gracias!!!
Me estoy aburriendo, as conejodescarado pointed out, would be correct, instead your first sentence.
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Old March 26, 2011, 01:38 AM
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In fact, yes, when you're using the past participle as an adjective (i.e. after estar/ser), you should entirely drop the reflexive pronoun. It's wrong to even have it there in the first place. Some romance languages use different auxiliary verbs for the reflexive and transitive verbs, so I actually wonder if this may have been a mistake and the intention of me estoy aburrido was actually to say me he aburrido.
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Old March 26, 2011, 03:46 PM
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CrOtALiTo CrOtALiTo is offline
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They logically are almost the same, inclusive I'm boring me and I'm bored they can be used in the same features.

Estoy aburriendome
Estoy aburrido.

The difference between them, that you are using the ING verbal mode, although bored is a simple word they can be used with the ING so you can use without ING or with ING.

Sincerely yours.
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Old March 27, 2011, 04:24 PM
ez123 ez123 is offline
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thank you this has ayudado mucho! grasias
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  #7  
Old March 30, 2011, 01:47 PM
Luna Azul Luna Azul is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ez123 View Post
Im not sure if there is any major grammatical difference to these two:

me estoy aburrido
estoy aburrido

with the "me" in front of the first, what does that do??? gracias!!!
The first sentence is incorrect.

I take it you want to say "I am bored". The second sentence is the correct way to say it.

Sentences using "me" are:

Me aburro = I get bored
Me estoy aburriendo/estoy aburriéndome = I am getting bored

As someone pointed out "me" is the reflexive pronoun for "yo":

Me enfermo = I get sick
Me levanto = I get up

Not all of them are translated using "get" in English. These are just a couple of examples to hopefully make you understand better

L.A.
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