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Llevarse un chasco

 

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not readily apparent based on the individual words in the expression. This forum is dedicated to discussing idioms and other sayings.


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Old May 24, 2011, 06:48 AM
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Llevarse un chasco

to be unpleasantly surprised?
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Old May 24, 2011, 08:04 AM
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Yes, it may be. It's like being deeply disappointed or be in an embarrassing situation as a result of our wrong expectations. There's in it a component of "suddenly realizing something that causes that".
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Old May 24, 2011, 10:17 AM
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Yes, my dictionary has:

chasco masculino

A (decepción) disappointment, let-down (familiar); me llevé or pegué un buen chasco I felt really let down o disappointed

B (broma) joke; una tienda que vende chascos a joke shop
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Old May 24, 2011, 10:31 AM
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I'd never seen the use of "chasco" as a joke. I have always seen it as a disappointment about something gone wrong unexpectedly.
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Old May 24, 2011, 11:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
to be unpleasantly surprised?
"I felt disappointed" - "I was disappointed"

I have never heard it as "joke"
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Old May 24, 2011, 11:57 AM
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"Chasco" includes pranks, especially those which relate with deception or traps and end up with a humiliated victim, like the pluricentennial bladder filled with water over the door. What meaning was first, the sudden prank or the sudden disappointment, it's hard to tell, but it's nice to read the definition in Diccionario de Autoridades - C (DRAE, first edition, 1729):



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Old May 24, 2011, 12:53 PM
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A common term for prank in English is practical joke.
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Old May 24, 2011, 08:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aleCcowaN View Post
"Chasco" includes pranks, especially those which relate with deception or traps and end up with a humiliated victim, like the pluricentennial bladder filled with water over the door. What meaning was first, the sudden prank or the sudden disappointment, it's hard to tell, but it's nice to read the definition in Diccionario de Autoridades - C (DRAE, first edition, 1729):
Thank you for that one. I had forgotten the one about the látigo. I guess that's where "chasquear" comes from, and I wonder about "chascón" y "chasca" too.
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