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Me cojió mucho aprecio

 

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not readily apparent based on the individual words in the expression. This forum is dedicated to discussing idioms and other sayings.


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  #1  
Old May 17, 2008, 10:43 PM
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Me cojió mucho aprecio

People,

How would this be translated: "Me cojió mucho aprecio"

Could you use it in a sentence as a refeerence?

Thanks in advance!

Dean
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  #2  
Old May 17, 2008, 11:14 PM
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Me cogió mucho aprecio could mean (he) held me in high regard/esteem, as in:
Siempre le daba algo de comer al mendigo, así que me cogió mucho aprecio.
(I always gave the beggar something to eat, so he held me in high regard.)

With more context we could probably come up with a better translation.
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Old May 18, 2008, 01:09 AM
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Rusty, I think he held me in high esteem is me tenía mucho aprecio. Me cogió mucho aprecio indicates a process so you could translate as he took to me or he got very attached to me. I'm probably being a bit punctilious, though.
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Old May 18, 2008, 05:13 AM
silopanna silopanna is offline
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Me cojió mucho aprecio

Rusty/Maria Jose,

Thanks for the tip. I think that it was used in the sense of "she took a liking to me," said about a young lady's boss on her first job.

I wasn't sure about which way the action was going, though. It's funny, because I am ever so fluent in Portuguese and speak Spanish well enough. But I couldn't tell if it were "she took a liking to me" or if it were "I took a liking to her." Or something like that.

Actually, I think it was the use of that verb, cojer. If it had been "me tenia mucho aprecio" it think that I would have taken it in stride.

Thanks again,

Dean

Last edited by silopanna; May 18, 2008 at 05:16 AM.
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Old May 18, 2008, 06:10 AM
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Thanks, Iris. Took a liking to me is perfect, but I opted for something stronger (for no apparent reason).
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Old May 18, 2008, 10:25 AM
silopanna silopanna is offline
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Le Cogí Mucho Aprecio

I went back and listened to the CD varias times now, and I see that I wasn't hearing correctly. What the lady actually said was "le cogí mucho aprecio."



I feel like a dummy, but now I know why it felt so strange to me, what she was saying. Now it fits the situation better.

Dean

Last edited by silopanna; May 18, 2008 at 10:52 AM.
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Old May 18, 2008, 12:20 PM
Alfonso Alfonso is offline
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So, I guess, I took a liking to him...
I didn't know this expression. Can be useful...

Le cogí mucho aprecio translates both:
  • I took a liking to him.
  • I took a liking to her.
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Old May 18, 2008, 12:25 PM
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Of course. And you can simply say I took to her/him.
e.g. I took to Paul as soon as we met.
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Old May 18, 2008, 12:35 PM
Alfonso Alfonso is offline
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So, I take to her, that's to say, I take a liking to her, in other words, I hold her in high esteem or respect (this last one is more formal, so it's not so sincere as the others are, isn't it?).
Wonderful expressions!
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Old May 18, 2008, 12:37 PM
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Why should more formal mean less sincere? Maybe a lesser degree of acquaintance...BTW the first two expressions don't usually make much sense in the present.
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Last edited by Iris; May 18, 2008 at 12:40 PM.
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