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  #1  
Old March 04, 2013, 11:40 AM
Jake Jake is offline
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New to spanish and need some help!

Hi all,
I'm thinking of moving to Spain when a little older and of course that means learning the language! I have only started around 3 days ago but already have a few question!
1) Whats the difference between A boy and A child in Spanish? (From what i have noticed is they are both niño!
2) i also have noticed that some words such as 'you are' have two ways of spelling, is this because its an alternative to the english 'you are' and 'you're'?
Thanks a lot in advance!
Jake
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  #2  
Old March 04, 2013, 12:51 PM
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AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
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Specific examples and questions from where you found these words and the usage that has caused you trouble would be very helpful.
Replies from what you have just said may be awfully confusing.

However:
1) There is no neuter gender in Spanish. When there is a notion of neuter gender, is usually expressed in masculine.
Context will tell the difference between "niño"-child and "niño"-boy.

2) Without knowing what exactly caused you confusion:
Your question could be related to the fact that the verb to be corresponds to two different verbs in Spanish: "ser" and "estar".
Or it could be related to the fact that the pronoun "you" corresponds to "tú" in singular informal, "usted" singular formal, "ustedes" plural informal/formal and "vosotros" informal.

So, "you are" and "you're" may be:

tú eres/estás
usted es/está
ustedes son/están
vosotros sois/estáis
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Old March 04, 2013, 02:38 PM
Jake Jake is offline
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Thank you for the help, really appreciate it mate! I am learning off a site know as duolingo, it teaches basic Spanish but doesn't explain certain things. Spanish is so confusing! There are so many words for the same thing :/

Last edited by Jake; March 04, 2013 at 02:59 PM.
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Old March 14, 2013, 02:57 AM
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pinosilano pinosilano is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake View Post
There are so many words for the same thing :/
Digo lo mismo del inglés.

Dos palabras sólo como ejemplo: "cast" y "forth".
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Old March 14, 2013, 04:33 AM
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Perikles Perikles is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake View Post
Spanish is so confusing! There are so many words for the same thing :/
Despair not! I find the most difficult aspect of Spanish is the number of different ways of saying the same thing. But it also has aspects which are easy compared to English.

It helps a lot if you realize how basic English grammar works. For example, you could refer to one (singular) or many (plural) people. In Spanish (and in every other language I can think of) they have different verb forms for singular and plural. English is the odd one out.

Keep asking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pinosilano View Post
Digo lo mismo del inglés.

Dos palabras sólo como ejemplo: "cast" y "forth".
That's a puzzle, cast is either a noun or verb, and forth is an adverb. How can they be similar?
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Old March 14, 2013, 10:35 AM
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AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
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@Perikles: I think Pinosilano is just saying that English also has "versatile" words; not only Spanish.
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Old March 14, 2013, 01:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
@Perikles: I think Pinosilano is just saying that English also has "versatile" words; not only Spanish.
Oh - I see. But forth only has one meaning - why is that versatile then?

He might have chosen set which has 32 different meanings according to the OED.
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Old March 14, 2013, 02:25 PM
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...or get.

I'm guessing again, but maybe Pino had in mind its use as a prefix too.
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Old March 16, 2013, 02:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
That's a puzzle, cast is either a noun or verb, and forth is an adverb. How can they be similar?
Similares por los mil usos que tienen cada una de esas dos palabras, no que son similares entre ellas. O son similares entre ellas porque cada una tiene mil usos o acepciones
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Old March 17, 2013, 09:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinosilano View Post
Digo lo mismo del inglés.

Dos palabras sólo como ejemplo: "cast" y "forth".
Y inglés tiene palabras como "too", "two", y "to". También, "you're" y "your", "whose" y "who's" y más.

Los dos son difícil aprender in their own ways (¡Ayúdame! ¿Como se dice en español?)

Last edited by abrink; March 17, 2013 at 09:51 PM. Reason: Mistake with accent
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