Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Grammar


In (the) notes he gave me, I learned that

 

This is the place for questions about conjugations, verb tenses, adverbs, adjectives, word order, syntax and other grammar questions for English or Spanish.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 19, 2013, 09:32 PM
Xinfu's Avatar
Xinfu Xinfu is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 996
Xinfu is on a distinguished road
In (the) notes he gave me, I learned that

-In (the) notes he gave me, I learned that in the Qing dynasty, province governors were appointed by the emperor himself.

I'd use THE, but is there any instance where we can omit THE?
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old July 19, 2013, 10:34 PM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,681
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
Using the definite article means that the speaker is referring to specific notes already mentioned or known.

It's possible to drop the definite article when referring to notes in general.
In notes taken at the time of the accident, ...
From notes found in her journal, ...
In notes from around the globe, ...

In notes he gave me, ... (not any notes in particular, but notes in general)
In the notes he gave me, ... (a specific set of notes, as opposed to other notes he may have written)
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old July 21, 2013, 10:37 AM
Xinfu's Avatar
Xinfu Xinfu is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 996
Xinfu is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
Using the definite article means that the speaker is referring to specific notes already mentioned or known.

It's possible to drop the definite article when referring to notes in general.
In notes taken at the time of the accident, ...
From notes found in her journal, ...
In notes from around the globe, ...

In notes he gave me, ... (not any notes in particular, but notes in general)
In the notes he gave me, ... (a specific set of notes, as opposed to other notes he may have written)
But, for example, for NOTES FOUND IN HER JOURNAL, isn't the thing being referred to very definite?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old July 21, 2013, 10:40 AM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,381
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
Not necessarily.
"The notes found in her journal" could refer to all of them, while "notes found in her journal" may talk about only a few of those notes.
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old July 22, 2013, 08:02 PM
Xinfu's Avatar
Xinfu Xinfu is offline
Emerald
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 996
Xinfu is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
It's possible to drop the definite article when referring to notes in general.
In notes taken at the time of the accident, ...
From notes found in her journal, ...
In notes from around the globe, ...

In notes he gave me, ... (not any notes in particular, but notes in general)
In the notes he gave me, ... (a specific set of notes, as opposed to other notes he may have written)
Pardon my quoting a long paragraph, because without doing so, the usage THE is difficult to discuss:

-We had all been warned to appear before the magistrates upon the Thursday; but when the Thursday came there was no occasion for our testimony. A higher Judge had taken the matter in hand, and Jefferson Hope had been summoned before a tribunal where strict justice would be meted out to him. On the very night after his capture the aneurism burst, and he was found in the morning stretched upon the floor of the cell, with a placid smile upon his face, as though he had been able in his dying moments to look back upon a useful life, and on work well done.


According to Rusty, am I correct in saying ON WORK WELL DONE refers to his work generally, while ON THE WORK WELL DONE would refer to, or be as opposed to, some particular work HE had done?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The musical notes Don José Practice & Homework 9 August 30, 2011 07:41 AM
To take notes/to make notes ROBINDESBOIS Vocabulary 4 January 30, 2011 02:57 AM
I gave Kpaso Translations 5 January 09, 2011 08:56 PM
Practicing - simple notes JosephThomas Grammar 9 December 14, 2010 10:50 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:49 PM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X