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Multi-use words: "como" and others

 

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Old October 09, 2013, 05:01 PM
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Multi-use words: "como" and others

Not sure if this is the right place to post if not could a moderator please move it to the correct place please.

Ok i've been thinking about the use of certain spanish words tgat I think mean the same thing such as,

"como" how,as (i think)
"bueno" good,happy,fine(i think)
"hacer" do,ask(i think)

And a few others and was wondering if someone could give me a list of words like these and thier meanings as I get really confused and could do with the knowledge.
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Old October 09, 2013, 05:24 PM
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There are many homonyms in Spanish, and there are many in English - too many to list.

Context helps you out in every case, otherwise there would be no way to know the difference between them.

It seems to me that you should learn the correct meaning of a new word as it is introduced to you rather than study them all right now.

In Spanish, a lot of the homonyms are actually spelled differently (one has an accent mark while the other does not). Since accent marks are a vital part of spelling, those two words cannot be confused (when properly spelled). For example, cómo, with an accent mark, means 'how'. It can never mean 'as'; that's spelled without an accent mark.

Bueno means 'good' for the most part. It can mean 'OK' or 'fine'. As a filler word, it means much the same as 'well'. It can be used as an interjection meaning 'hello' (when answering the phone). Used with the verb 'estar', instead of 'ser', it means 'sexy'.
Hacer is 'do' and 'make' (not 'ask'). It isn't a homonym. It's a verb that has two English translations. This is kind of like having two different verbs in Spanish for 'is'.
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Old October 10, 2013, 02:24 AM
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Ahhh ok thanks for the help rusty it's good to know

Muchas gracias Rusty
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Old October 10, 2013, 09:28 PM
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Complementing what Rusty said:
Como: like, such as, as, or it is also 'to eat' (the verb "comer" conjugated with "yo")
Hacer: 'to cause' and 'to obligate' or 'to force'

Hope it helps
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Old October 11, 2013, 04:00 PM
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Thanks AMG also what about "yo" I think it means "I" is this right and doea it have any other meanings such as "am" or "us".
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Old October 11, 2013, 05:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orangeamigo16 View Post
Thanks AMG also what about "yo" I think it means "I" is this right and doea it have any other meanings such as "am" or "us".
It is right, and it doesn't have any other meaning
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Old October 11, 2013, 05:25 PM
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Yes i'm happy right now as I am learning alot of espanol now hee hee. Is "usted" "you" or is there a different way of saying "you".
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Old October 11, 2013, 11:09 PM
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Hola. I'm so glad for you . Yes, 'you' means 'tú', 'ti' (possesive pronoun), 'vos' (in some countries, that is the same than 'tú'), 'usted', 'ustedes' and 'vosotros'.
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Old October 12, 2013, 02:24 AM
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Yeah thanks AMG your alot of help to me . What about others such as "of","an","and","me","is" and any others like that the short words it would be much appreciated muchas gracias AMG. Also how about "no" in espanol does it just mean "no" in english or has it got other meanings as well.

Last edited by Orangeamigo16; October 12, 2013 at 03:11 AM.
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Old October 12, 2013, 05:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orangeamigo16 View Post
Yeah thanks AMG your alot of help to me . What about others such as "of","an","and","me","is" and any others like that the short words it would be much appreciated muchas gracias AMG. Also how about "no" in espanol does it just mean "no" in english or has it got other meanings as well.

"No" in Spanish can be "no" and "not" in English. But "no" in English can also be "ningún/ninguno/ninguna, etc." in Spanish or even "nada de".

A pleasure.
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