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Old March 22, 2009, 10:38 AM
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Deep, high, long, wide

I hope no one is offended if I sometimes wander into translations having to do with religious things. One of my learning-tools is reading from a Spanish Bible - la fe es lo mas importante en mi vida.

Having said that ... this morning in our church service, the pastor made a little list of statements about God's love for us. (He used the verses Ephesians 1:7 and 3:18.) I loved the list, and wanted to re-write it in Spanish.

In English, the verse (3:18, NAS) uses the words "breadth and length and height and depth". Those are nouns. But in his list, the pastor changed them to adjectives: "wide, long, high, deep".

In the Reina-Valera (1995), the nouns are: "la anchura, la longitud, la profundidad y la altura".

If I were translating those adjectives to Spanish, would they be: "ancho, largo, alto, y profundo"?
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  #2  
Old March 22, 2009, 11:01 AM
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Those are correct.
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Old March 22, 2009, 11:09 AM
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Thanks, Rusty. Let me ask you this as well: is the "g" in "la longitud" a soft g, like the "x"?
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Old March 22, 2009, 11:10 AM
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Whenever g is followed by e or i, it's pronounced like the Spanish j.
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Old March 22, 2009, 11:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
Whenever g is followed by e or i, it's pronounced like the Spanish j.
How about Xavier and Oaxaca?

Could the second one be just a native sound?

But then again Mexicans pronounce the female name of Xiomara as an S?!
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Old March 22, 2009, 11:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chileno View Post
How about Xavier and Oaxaca?

Could the second one be just a native sound?

But then again Mexicans pronounce the female name of Xiomara as an S?!
Whoa - did you just change that? It quoted differently than it read when I first looked at it. (Twilight zone.........)

Anyway - I guess that I was thinking of the "x" the way "we" (Americans) were taught that Mexicans say the word "Me-hee-co". What are the different ways of saying "x"?
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Old March 22, 2009, 01:38 PM
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@Lou Ann: "X" has tricky pronunciations that sound rather arbitrary. Pronunciation like "x", "s", "sh" and "j" changes according to indigenous and foreign language origins of words, but it's nothing you cannot learn through the common practice.

"X" pronounced like the "x" you know in English: "excelente", "extra", "ex-esposo" (ex-husband), "extranjero" (foreigner), "exigir" (to claim, to demand), "Félix", "tórax"...

Some examples of "x" pronounced like "j": México, Xalapa, Oaxaca, Texas (all of these are proper names).
Pronounced like "s": Xochimilco, Texcoco, xilófono...
Pronounced like "sh": Xoloescuintle (a sort of dog), xixi (a herb that is used as some kind of soap), mixiote (seasoned meat wrapped in a thin leaf of aloe), xtabentún (an anise liquor), xoconostle (a sour prickly pear), Xola...


I think Spanish forummers can add plenty of examples as well.
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Old March 22, 2009, 02:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
@Lou Ann: "X" has tricky pronunciations that sound rather arbitrary. Pronunciation like "x", "s", "sh" and "j" changes according to indigenous and foreign language origins of words, but it's nothing you cannot learn through the common practice.

"X" pronounced like the "x" you know in English: "excelente", "extra", "ex-esposo" (ex-husband), "extranjero" (foreigner), "exigir" (to claim, to demand), "Félix", "tórax"...

Some examples of "x" pronounced like "j": México, Xalapa, Oaxaca, Texas (all of these are proper names).
Pronounced like "s": Xochimilco, Texcoco, xilófono...
Pronounced like "sh": Xoloescuintle (a sort of dog), xixi (a herb that is used as some kind of soap), mixiote (seasoned meat wrapped in a thin leaf of aloe), xtabentún (an anise liquor), xoconostle (a sour prickly pear), Xola...


I think Spanish forummers can add plenty of examples as well.
I am sorry to all, but I took this thread as being talked about the letter X and not the letter G.

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Old March 22, 2009, 06:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelicaDeAlquezar View Post
@Lou Ann: "X" has tricky pronunciations that sound rather arbitrary. Pronunciation like "x", "s", "sh" and "j" changes according to indigenous and foreign language origins of words, but it's nothing you cannot learn through the common practice.

"X" pronounced like the "x" you know in English: "excelente", "extra", "ex-esposo" (ex-husband), "extranjero" (foreigner), "exigir" (to claim, to demand), "Félix", "tórax"...

Some examples of "x" pronounced like "j": México, Xalapa, Oaxaca, Texas (all of these are proper names).
Pronounced like "s": Xochimilco, Texcoco, xilófono...
Pronounced like "sh": Xoloescuintle (a sort of dog), xixi (a herb that is used as some kind of soap), mixiote (seasoned meat wrapped in a thin leaf of aloe), xtabentún (an anise liquor), xoconostle (a sour prickly pear), Xola...


I think Spanish forummers can add plenty of examples as well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chileno View Post
I am sorry to all, but I took this thread as being talked about the letter X and not the letter G.

Malila - THANKS for those examples. I think that I don't get "Oaxaca" ... for some reason, I can't make my mouth say the "x" like a "j"... But that's okay because I still can't make my mouth say most r and rr sounds, either.

Hernan - it is kind of about BOTH "g" and "x" ... I brought up the "x" when asking about the "g" in "longitud".....
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Old March 22, 2009, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Malila - THANKS for those examples. I think that I don't get "Oaxaca" ... for some reason, I can't make my mouth say the "x" like a "j"... But that's okay because I still can't make my mouth say most r and rr sounds, either.

Hernan - it is kind of about BOTH "g" and "x" ... I brought up the "x" when asking about the "g" in "longitud".....
Yes, and Rusty's explanation was very clear, however I "wanted" to talk about X.
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