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Old December 06, 2009, 12:11 PM
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Dog-cart

Is there any cart pulled by horses (not by dogs) called "dog-cart"? Surely this is an old word.

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Old December 06, 2009, 12:19 PM
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Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
Is there any cart pulled by horses (not by dogs) called "dog-cart"? Surely this is an old word.

Thanks
Yes- a dog-cart is in fact pulled by horses, or one horse.

Oddly, I heard the word recently in a play by Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest. A brilliant play. Somebody needs transport, and the butler announces 'The Dog-Cart is waiting, Sir'. (A horse-driven cart to take someone to the station)

(It was originally designed to take one person and his dogs)
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Old December 06, 2009, 12:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
Yes- a dog-cart is in fact pulled by horses, or one horse.

Oddly, I heard the word recently in a play by Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest. A brilliant play. Somebody needs transport, and the butler announces 'The Dog-Cart is waiting, Sir'. (A horse-driven cart to take someone to the station)

(It was originally designed to take one person and his dogs)
Yes, that's another book that I'm reading now (much better than the other one by Lawrence ), and the word is from this book.

So, maybe you heard "trot round" (a bit before). I've found "trot round" with the meaning of walking around (the Empire, in a former passage). But when Jack asks Chasuble for christening him, he says he might "trot round" about five. Does he say that he could go walking (dando un paseo) to the parish for christening at that time?

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Old December 06, 2009, 01:57 PM
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Originally Posted by irmamar View Post
So, maybe you heard "trot round" (a bit before). I've found "trot round" with the meaning of walking around (the Empire, in a former passage). But when Jack asks Chasuble for christening him, he says he might "trot round" about five. Does he say that he could go walking (dando un paseo) to the parish for christening at that time?
No entiendo qué quieres decir con eso. (Estaría claro por contexto si pudiera acordarme del libro, pero mi memoria es como un... ¿cómo se llaman esas cosas con muchos agujeros? )

"Trot round" es como "Come round" pero especifica la manera de venir. Otros ejemplos de la estructura sería "I might cycle over after tea"; "Drive round when you're free and we'll have a coffee". "Trot" aquí sí que sería una manera informal de decir "andar".
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Old December 06, 2009, 06:42 PM
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No entiendo qué quieres decir con eso. (Estaría claro por contexto si pudiera acordarme del libro, pero mi memoria es como un... ¿cómo se llaman esas cosas con muchos agujeros? )

"Trot round" es como "Come round" pero especifica la manera de venir. Otros ejemplos de la estructura sería "I might cycle over after tea"; "Drive round when you're free and we'll have a coffee". "Trot" aquí sí que sería una manera informal de decir "andar".
But, would that mean like in a hurry, though? Like in "trotting"?
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Old December 07, 2009, 01:14 AM
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when Jack asks Chasuble for christening him

Cuando Jack le pide a Chasuble que le bautice. (well, that's what I wanted to say )

So, I guess that would mean that Jack wants to go to the church in a cart (because horses trot)
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Old December 07, 2009, 01:29 AM
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But, would that mean like in a hurry, though? Like in "trotting"?
Not necessarily. I think it's a case of using a synonym for effect rather than precision, and he could equally have said "amble round" (which if used for precision would be slower than normal walking speed).

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when Jack asks Chasuble for christening him

Cuando Jack le pide a Chasuble que le bautice. (well, that's what I wanted to say )
When Jack asks Chasuble to christen him.
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Old December 07, 2009, 01:48 AM
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Not necessarily. I think it's a case of using a synonym for effect rather than precision, and he could equally have said "amble round" (which if used for precision would be slower than normal walking speed).


When Jack asks Chasuble to christen him.
I though "to ask for" means "pedir". So, you say "preguntar" in this case.
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Old December 07, 2009, 02:00 AM
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I though "to ask for" means "pedir". So, you say "preguntar" in this case.
I don't understand - Jack is requesting something, so here it's pedir
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Old December 07, 2009, 02:24 AM
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Pedir un objeto es "to ask for".
Pedirle a alguien un objeto es "to ask someone for".
Pedirle a alguien que haga algo es "to ask someone to do something".
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