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Old May 24, 2010, 11:08 AM
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Volar vs. remontar

I would guess that "volar" is used mostly with airplanes, although I have a friend who calls herself "volada" all the time. When is "remontar" used? Compare & contrast?

Thanks!!
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Old May 24, 2010, 11:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
I would guess that "volar" is used mostly with airplanes, although I have a friend who calls herself "volada" all the time. When is "remontar" used? Compare & contrast?

Thanks!!
Volar = to fly

Remontar = To gain height.

Volada in the case of your friends means to not be paying attention.
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Old May 24, 2010, 11:48 AM
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Interesting, because I discovered the word "remontar" in the following sentence: "Tengo memorias buenas de remontar una cometa con mi abuelo."

In English we'd say "to fly a kite"....

So is "remontar" related to "subir"? How so?
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Old May 24, 2010, 11:49 AM
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Originally Posted by chileno View Post
Volada in the case of your friends means to not be paying attention.
I've heard 'volando' for someone not doing their job properly because they are chaotic. Is that the same?
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Old May 24, 2010, 11:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
Interesting, because I discovered the word "remontar" in the following sentence: "Tengo memorias buenas de remontar una cometa con mi abuelo."

In English we'd say "to fly a kite"....

So is "remontar" related to "subir"? How so?
Right. The idea is to make the kite gain height. "remontarlo en el aire" literally "make it ride the air/wind"
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Old May 24, 2010, 11:51 AM
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Cool! I love how many different words there are for things in Spanish!
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Old May 24, 2010, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by laepelba View Post
I would guess that "volar" is used mostly with airplanes, although I have a friend who calls herself "volada" all the time. When is "remontar" used? Compare & contrast?

Thanks!!

Well, I've heard the word volada(o) to mean someone who is flirty.
Por ejemplo: Ella/El es muy volada(o).
When someone is working and is volando, this means they are doing their work fast and correct or they might be multi-tasking. The weird thing is that people don't say "está volando", they say "anda volando"

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Old May 24, 2010, 12:45 PM
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When my friend says it, she seems to mean "air headed" or "forgetful" or something along those lines. And she usually says "soy volada"......
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Old May 24, 2010, 01:08 PM
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"Remontar una cometa" That doesn't sound any good to me, but the use seems to be valid in the dictionary.
"Volar una cometa" is much more common, at least for me.

"Remontar" is a verb that is almost never used around here, except in some literary contexts, where "remontar el vuelo" is said of flying objects.

"Estar volado(a)" around here means that one is either enthusiastic about something or in a hurry.
"Ser volado(a)" is not used here, but maybe regional use means to be always distracted.

To do something "volando", in Mexico would mean to do something in a hurry, so it's natural that the one doing it is not paying attention.
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Old May 24, 2010, 01:13 PM
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I believe I have seen the word remontar when it is synonomous to mount up.

The debt is mounting up.
El débito está remontando.
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