Ask a Question

(Create a thread)
Go Back   Spanish language learning forums > Spanish & English Languages > Vocabulary > Idioms & Sayings


Duro y a la cabeza

 

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not readily apparent based on the individual words in the expression. This forum is dedicated to discussing idioms and other sayings.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old January 01, 2011, 02:54 AM
aneta aneta is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 2
aneta is on a distinguished road
Duro y a la cabeza

hola!
me interesa si alguien me pudiera ayudar con el significado (o traducción al inglés) de la expresión DURO Y A LA CABEZA. la definición del diccionariio fraseológico (M.Seco)es:
aconsejar la contundencia de una actuación o de un castigo; y el ejemplo:
¿Tiritos por las esquinas? ¿Cuestiones sociales? Ni por asomo, Vuecencia, con la venia. ¡Duro y a la cabeza!
la verdad q eso no me ayude mucho.
saldos, y feliz Año Nuevo!!

Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old January 01, 2011, 03:06 AM
aleCcowaN's Avatar
aleCcowaN aleCcowaN is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Posts: 3,127
Native Language: Castellano
aleCcowaN is on a distinguished road
"duro y a la cabeza" is supposed to be a blow, literally "(hit) hard and on the head" meaning that, or figuratively, "actúa de manera contundente" (act bluntly, forcefully, severely, hardly, conclusively ... I'm not 100% sure of these)
__________________
[gone]
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old January 01, 2011, 04:57 PM
JPablo's Avatar
JPablo JPablo is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 5,579
Native Language: Spanish (Castilian, peninsular)
JPablo is on a distinguished road
I agree with AleC. That is "hit hard and on the head" is the literal translation.
In wickidictionary they give
expresión para animar, azuzar, animar a atacar.

So if you play or coach basketball you could say "ataquen 'duro y a la cabeza' y defiendan con solidez..."

In the context you give it may seem to mean "shoot them hard and on the head" but figuratively, just attack them with no qualms...
__________________
Lo propio de la verdad es que se basta a sí misma, aquel que la posee no intenta convencer a nadie.
"An enemy is somebody who flatters you. A friend is somebody who criticizes the living daylights out of you."
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old January 01, 2011, 09:43 PM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,300
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
I agree with both replies. The expression demands to aim right and hit hard.
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old January 03, 2011, 04:39 AM
aneta aneta is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 2
aneta is on a distinguished road
gracas a todos!
saludos...
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old January 03, 2011, 12:03 PM
JPablo's Avatar
JPablo JPablo is offline
Diamond
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 5,579
Native Language: Spanish (Castilian, peninsular)
JPablo is on a distinguished road
¡De nada, Aneta!
__________________
Lo propio de la verdad es que se basta a sí misma, aquel que la posee no intenta convencer a nadie.
"An enemy is somebody who flatters you. A friend is somebody who criticizes the living daylights out of you."
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old January 31, 2019, 11:37 PM
ArnulfoNovo ArnulfoNovo is offline
Opal
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 1
ArnulfoNovo is on a distinguished road
Significado

En inglés se puede entender cómo “straightforward “
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old April 28, 2019, 08:33 AM
deandddd deandddd is offline
Ruby
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 57
deandddd is on a distinguished road
Angelica,

I have to agree with you. I have always thought that a tgood translation would be "aim right, hit hard".

But something more organic to the English language, that we would say in the same situation, might be "let'em have it with both barrels!" In this case, "both barrels" means both barrels of a shotgun.

I think it is more accurate to translate intentions and situations, but this concept goes far beyond the understanding of most people, and invites undue criticism to the good translator/interpreter.

Silopanna/Dean

Last edited by deandddd; April 28, 2019 at 08:35 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old April 28, 2019, 12:37 PM
AngelicaDeAlquezar's Avatar
AngelicaDeAlquezar AngelicaDeAlquezar is offline
Obsidiana
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 8,300
Native Language: Mexican Spanish
AngelicaDeAlquezar is on a distinguished road
Indeed, Dean. I normally avoid translations because I can't always figure out an equivalent way to say things. I just try to explain what I think something means and let the native speaker find an accurate way to say it in their language.

Thanks for the new expression, I didn't know it.
__________________
Ain't it wonderful to be alive when the Rock'n'Roll plays...
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
El/lo que faltaba para el duro ROBINDESBOIS Idioms & Sayings 3 October 25, 2010 04:25 PM
Es duro de pelar ROBINDESBOIS Idioms & Sayings 1 February 03, 2010 03:22 AM
Ser duro de mollera cpuzey1 Idioms & Sayings 1 January 23, 2010 08:47 AM
No te me vengas ahora abajo, lo más duro ya ha pasado ROBINDESBOIS Idioms & Sayings 1 October 08, 2009 10:56 AM
Cabeza DailyWord Daily Spanish Word 14 February 14, 2009 07:44 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:45 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X