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  #1  
Old September 13, 2015, 03:21 AM
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Process

Could I use process as uncount?

-First, similar brainwave production process was undergone for the two types of trilinguals.

My friend says no, because for process, I have to use a before similar; but my opinion is different, because the word could be uncount sometimes, though I can say for sure when.
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  #2  
Old September 13, 2015, 05:37 AM
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While it is true that 'process' can be used in a general sense and would, therefore, be classified as uncountable, in the sentence you posted, I would use its countable form in colloquial dialog.

a similar ... process

That said, this sentence looks like it came from a study where general usage (uncountable nouns) is commonplace. So, the sentence is fine the way it is.
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Old September 17, 2015, 09:57 AM
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Excellent answer. Thank you.
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Old September 17, 2015, 11:03 AM
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Maybe I'm missing a shorthand used in this forum, but I don't understand this sentence: "Could I use process as uncount?"

I assume you mean "is process an uncountable noun".

Similarly, I don't understand this sentence: "First, similar brainwave production process was undergone for the two types of trilinguals." So, I disagree with Rusty -- the sentence is not fine the way it is.

"First, a similar brainwave production process was undergone..." -- that "a" is mandatory.

But, I think the sentence would be easier to read if it were: "First, the two types of trilinguals underwent a similar brainwave production process."

For what it's worth, I have no context for this sentence, and am hung up on what a "brainwave production process" is. It seems like something the trilinguals do, but it's being treated like something that is being done to them.
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Old September 17, 2015, 03:43 PM
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You aren't disagreeing with me, MWoll. Everything you said, I said.
But I went on to say that the register used in the sentence appears to be such that the uncountable form doesn't sound out of place.
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Old September 20, 2015, 02:19 AM
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Good answers. Thank you.

Is MVoll's first language American English?
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Old September 20, 2015, 06:14 PM
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Yes, I'm from California.
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Old September 27, 2015, 04:30 AM
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Thank you. I will be immensely grateful if you could be my English teacher here.
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Old September 28, 2015, 01:04 PM
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I will certainly do my best to comment on everything. I have a very relaxed view of grammar; I'm very colloquial.

For instance, I think it's okay to split infinitives and end sentences with prepositions. But I'm also a professional writer, so I don't do this because I disregard grammar, I just think most people are strict for no reason, and it hurts their ability to sound normal. I understand, though, that not everybody speaks like a Californian.
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Old September 28, 2015, 04:36 PM
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Before anybody thinks that we shouldn't split infinitives or that we shouldn't end a sentence with a preposition, I'll add that these "rules" are myths.

English has had split infinitives in its literature dating all the way back to the 1300's, and we've been slapping prepositions on the end of sentences for almost 300 years.
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