#1  
Old January 08, 2009, 05:23 PM
Jessica's Avatar
Jessica Jessica is offline
...
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 8,187
Native Language: English, Chinese
Jessica is on a distinguished road
Question Pig Latin & Spanglish

I've heard of Pig Latin but I don't understand what it is really. I know Spanglish is a cross between English and Spanish (right?) but I don't understand that either.
Reply With Quote
   
Get rid of these ads by registering for a free Tomísimo account.
  #2  
Old January 08, 2009, 05:30 PM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,622
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
There are many places online that teach the basics of Pig Latin. It is only used by English-speakers and is merely a jumbled form of English. It is usually used to keep a conversation private from untrained ears.

Spanglish will vary from place to place. It is a mix of Spanish and English. You and your Spanish class probably use a form of Spanglish every day.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old January 09, 2009, 06:12 AM
Jessica's Avatar
Jessica Jessica is offline
...
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 8,187
Native Language: English, Chinese
Jessica is on a distinguished road
ok thanks can you give me an example of Pig Latin?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old January 09, 2009, 07:20 AM
Rusty's Avatar
Rusty Rusty is offline
Señor Speedy
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 10,622
Native Language: American English
Rusty has a spectacular aura aboutRusty has a spectacular aura about
There are varying degrees of rules, some easier to master at first. I'll teach you what I learned. There are other ways.

Here is a normal English sentence:
I want to go to the store.

Here is the same sentence, but rendered in Pig Latin:
I-yay ant-way o-tay o-gay o-tay e-thay ore-stay.

To form each word, take the initial consonant (or consonant cluster) sound, suffix it to the end, and add an 'ay' sound (like the 'ay' in say - in Spanish, 'ei'). When the word doesn't begin with a consonant sound, only the 'ay' sound is suffixed. However, some people like to throw in a consonant to make up for the absence of one. So, you'll also see -way, -yay or -hay as a suffix. I learned to use -yay.

Here are some more examples:
through -> ough-thray
feast -> east-fay
sorry -> orry-say
quiet -> iet-quay
eagle -> eagle-way (eagle-yay, eagle-ay)

You can try out this Pig Latin Translator site.
(There's a box to check under the translation area if you want to see the hyphen.
I think some sort of punctuation is needed. Otherwise, 'ayspray' could be translated back into English as spray (ay-spray) or prays (ays-pray).)

Some people like to split compound words into respective parts.
For example:
international -> inter-way-ational-nay
multilingual -> ulti-may-ingual-lay
bedroom -> ed-bay-oom-ray
buttermilk -> utter-bay-ilk-may
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old January 13, 2009, 05:31 AM
Jessica's Avatar
Jessica Jessica is offline
...
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 8,187
Native Language: English, Chinese
Jessica is on a distinguished road
thank you ^_^
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmark this thread at:

 

Link to this thread
URL: 
HTML Link: 
BB Code: 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Site Rules

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pues & A Ver writerscramp1107 Vocabulary 11 December 17, 2011 07:17 PM
How to ask questions(in Spanglish) Suavemente Practice & Homework 3 November 02, 2008 08:35 AM
cayó & rodando raji Practice & Homework 2 July 01, 2008 08:09 AM
Spanglish the movie Zach General Chat 3 June 01, 2006 01:09 PM
How come & why Tomisimo Grammar 7 May 25, 2006 08:39 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:39 AM.

Forum powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

X