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AS versus LIKE

 

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  #1  
Old June 14, 2010, 02:27 AM
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Lightbulb AS versus LIKE

When making a manner clause what the difference between the conjunctions as and like in grammatical terms?
e.g.: Nobody loves like me - Nobody loves you as I do.
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  #2  
Old June 14, 2010, 02:34 AM
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I would say both are correct, but as is more formal, and better because it avoids ambiguity.

Time flies like an arrow
Fruit flies like a banana

I think that as requires a verb to follow

Nobody loves you like me
Nobody loves you as I do
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Old June 14, 2010, 02:35 AM
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what are the other structures? if any?

What about she is acting like she really doesn´t like him.

Last edited by AngelicaDeAlquezar; June 14, 2010 at 09:34 AM. Reason: Merged back-to-back posts
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Old June 14, 2010, 02:47 AM
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I've changed my mind - I see you ask about clauses. You can use like for a phrase: he laughed like a hyena, but as is the usual one for a clause.

Also, 'as if' and 'as though' introduce a clause of manner which involves comparison.
"I'll do the exercises as I've been taught."
"She cooks a turkey exactly as my mother did."
"He treats me as if I were a stranger."
"He looks as if he’s sick."
"He ran as though his life depended on it."

Now some people would use like in all the above, but I would not, especially the last two.

He looks like he's sick. Some would say this, but it sounds terrible to me.

Edit: as does "What about she is acting like she really doesn´t like him."
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Old June 14, 2010, 02:52 AM
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Ok thanks, I found that example somewhere. So basically the rule is that as is followed by a verb or a dependent clause. I guess.
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Old June 14, 2010, 02:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ROBINDESBOIS View Post
Ok thanks, I found that example somewhere. So basically the rule is that as is followed by a verb or a dependent clause. I guess.
It may be AmE usage, so I'm not saying it is actually wrong, merely that it sounds terrible to me.
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Old June 14, 2010, 04:52 AM
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It sounds perfectly normal to me as an AmE speaker.. infact it sounds better... using as for those last two sound very highbrow to me.

My way of saying those examples:

""I'll do the exercises like I've been taught." I would change to like here.
"She cooks a turkey exactly like my mother did." I would change it to like here also.
"He treats me like a stranger." Would reword entirely to what I put.
"He looks like he’s sick." This one definitely. The others not so much but this one sounds pretty bad to me. He looks like he's sick sounds 100x better to me.
"He ran like his life depended on it." Would change to like.

Last edited by wafflestomp; June 14, 2010 at 05:00 AM.
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Old June 14, 2010, 06:29 AM
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that´s good to know it´s also correct . Thank you both
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Old June 14, 2010, 07:01 AM
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Like is a preposition, and as is a conjunction. People often treat like,
as a conjunction in everyday speech however. I use it, but when I you wish to sound educated in a formal environment, or if you wish to write a formal document I avoid the use of like as a conjunction.
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Last edited by poli; June 14, 2010 at 07:07 AM.
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Old June 29, 2010, 12:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poli View Post
Like is a preposition, and as is a conjunction. People often treat like,
as a conjunction in everyday speech however. I use it, but when I you wish to sound educated in a formal environment, or if you wish to write a formal document I avoid the use of like as a conjunction.
Great point Poli. "Like" is used incorrectly from a grammatical standpoint in everyday conversation in American English. As Wafflestomp pointed out, his sentences sound "normal" for American English. Americans really like the word "like."

Technically Incorrect (but very common in American speech): He looks like he needs a place to rest.
Correct: He looks as if he needs a place to rest.

In general, a noun follows a "like" while a noun & verb clause follow "as."

Good link for reading.
http://www.grammar-quizzes.com/like-as.html

Last edited by Awaken; June 29, 2010 at 12:05 PM.
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